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MonaVie Scam Exposed!

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[Editor's Note: MonaVie has threatened legal action against me twice in an attempt to prevent you from reading this article below. Since I'm within my legal rights to criticize the company they've turned to gaming Google to push this article down the search results - an attempt to prevent you from getting the information you need to make an informed decision about the company. This article has been completely updated (as of June 2012) from the ground up to reflect much of the information found from the huge discussion (6000+ comments) that you'll find following the article. The original article about my introduction to MonaVie is preserved here. Reading 6000 comments may not be practical, so I've put some of the most important information at the Juice Scam website. However, due to time constraints, even that doesn't have the information in these comments.]

Is MonaVie a Scam?

Is MonaVie a Scam?

Is MonaVie a Scam?

The short answer is yes. The longer answer? It is perhaps the most incredible example of deceptive marketing in the history of mankind.

What I've found is tons of irrefutable evidence supported by reputable third parties that MonaVie is a grossly overpriced product, with little nutritional value, wrapped in a poor business opportunity that appears to be illegal pyramid scheme, supported by nonsensical "scientific" studies and illegal medical claims.

That's a lot to digest. I'm going to give you a minute to re-read that.

Typically when people are interested in MonaVie, they are focused on two things: 1) The nutritional value of the product and 2) the business opportunity. After all, the promise of MonaVie marketing is health and wealth for you and all your friends.

MonaVie's Nutritional Value

Many of MonaVie's claims come on something called a ORAC value. It's a lab test that measures anti-oxidants in food. On the face of it higher ORAC seems better, but there's a lot more to it than that. I'm not a doctor, so I'm not going to try to explain ORAC to you. However, Dr. Jonny Bowden explains that MonaVie doesn't cure cancer and gives great detail about ORAC in the process.

There are a couple more issues with regard to MonaVie an ORAC values. High on the list is that MonaVie lies about the ORAC score of MonaVie. They published two widely different scores.

Many distributors make the claim that drinking 4 ounces of MonaVie is like eating 13 fruits and thus is a way to save money. This is a huge lie. MonaVie put out marketing material that said it "Delivers the antioxidant capacity of approximately 13 servings of fruits and vegetables in just four ounces." MonaVie set up a the classic telephone game where the initial message conveyed changes as it passes through the downline and the words, "antioxidant capacity" get left out. In this statement, the antioxidant capacity is measured ORAC value, and the equivalent fruits and vegetables are not even mentioned. A MonaVie product specialist cleared this up when called, but MonaVie didn't issue a clarification or change its website for years... see more at Drinking MonaVie is Not Equal to Eating 13 Fruits.

To follow up on the above, a single apple has the antioxidant capacity of 9.5 ounces of MonaVie. If a person was relying on four ounces of MonaVie to give them the equivalent of 13 fruits, they are making a huge nutritional error as 13 apples has the equivalent ORAC value as 123 ounces of MonaVie. MonaVie Original retails for around $1.48 an ounce, so that's around $182 of juice for the equivalent antioxidant capacity of 13 apples.

A consortium of U.S. government agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), USDA, and the FDA to put out guidelines on fruit and veggies and serving size. The result is that 4 ounces of MonaVie is a Serving of fruit which looks like 1 snack container of applesauce (4oz) or about 6 baby carrots. At MonaVie's retail price of around $6.00 for four ounces that's like buying a baby carrot for $1.00!

If you need a little more evidence on the nutritional value of MonaVie, Men's Journal put several fruit juices to the test using criteria set up by a director or clinical nutrition. The result was horrendous, "MonaVie tested extremely low in anthocyanins and phenolics. Even apple juice (which also tested poorly) has more phenolics..." and "Plus, MonaVie’s vitamin C level was five times lower than that of Welch’s Grape Juice. That’s not many nutrients, especially at $1.20 a serving." Website changes have divided the article into many pieces, but the you can read it in two parts: part 1 and part 2 with the MonaVie-specific comments.

What do national doctors have to say? Dr. Andrew Weil gives a thumbs down on MonaVie, Dr. Dean Edell calls MonaVie worthless, and Dr. Joe Schwarcz warns against acai health claims. These are all unbiased, nationally-recognized doctors.

I could continue to give facts about the lack of nutrition in MonaVie, but perhaps the creator of MonaVie itself is one of the best sources. The Salt Lake Tribune reported this interesting information that came out from a lawsuit with Amway:

The suit also uncovered an internal MonaVie memo by Ralph Carson, the company's chief science officer, who created the original juice. The memo was in response to raised eyebrows about claims being made about the juice. Carson cautioned that the drink was "expensive flavored water. Any claims made are purely hypothetical, unsubstantiated and, quite frankly, bogus."

Those claims that he's referring to are the illegal health claims that we'll get to in a bit.

Juice in general is not healthy

Another aspect to consider is that juice itself is shown not to be healthy. For years we thought it was healthy, but that thinking has changed and many view soda and juice as being the same. The HBO documentary Weight of a Nation clearly spells this out.

Here are some key quotes from that video: "Soda and other sugary drinks... is the only individual food that is directly related to obesity", "There is nothing in a soft drink that is good for you. A Twinkie or a potato chip or a candy bar has at least a little nutrition. These sugared beverages have none at all", and "Juice is just like soda... there is no difference. When you take fruit and you squeeze it, you throw the fiber in the garbage. That was the good part of the fruit. The juice is nature's way of getting you to eat your fiber."

When we take the statements above together, juice the same as soda, soda having less nutrition than a potato chip, it is clear that MonaVie can't be nutritious. The processing has stripped out the fiber... the good part of the fruit. Some may argue that MonaVie is only four ounces a day and it's not going to contribute to obesity. Well that 120 calories a day does add up... in a year it is 12.5 pounds (43,800 yearly calories divided by 3,500 calories in a pound).

(To prevent MonaVie distributors claiming that HBO doesn't know anything about health, Weight of a Nation was done with "the Institute of Medicine (IOM), in association with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).")

As you can tell from the label above, MonaVie doesn't have much of the fiber that comes from fruit naturally. Recently MonaVie started to add "fake" fiber (Fibersol-2 / Maltodextrin), so consumers looking at the nutritional label could be easily tricked into thinking that they are getting the good part of the fruit.

MonaVie's Specialized Health Drinks

MonaVie adds a special ingredient or two to its basic juice to create a juice for a specific purpose. The above illustrated the minimal value of the juice alone. Let's look at a few versions:

MonaVie Active - This MonaVie juice's star ingredients is glucosamine. In four ounces of MonaVie Active there are 1500mg of glucosamine. On Amazon.com, I found that you can get 375 tablets of Kirkland Glucosamine HCI for a price of $22.55 (as of 6/8/2012). It takes two tablets to equal the 1500mg of glucosamine in MonaVie Active, which comes out to 12 cents a day.

For a year, the Kirkland glucosamine will cost you $43.80. For a year of MonaVie Active (4 ounces * 365 days = 1460 ounces is about 58 and half bottles (25 ounces per bottle). At the retail price of $45 a bottle, 58 bottles costs $2,610 a year. You can save some money by buying MonaVie Active in bulk, but you'll never get the price under $1000, especially with shipping. You'll save at least a thousand dollars, perhaps two thousand by going with the equivalent cheap solution from Amazon or your local drug store.

With this noted, scientific research shows that it probably is not worth buying glucosamine at all.

MonaVie Pulse - This MonaVie juice's star ingredients are plant sterols and resveratrol added. In four ounces of MonaVie Pulse there are 0.8g of plant sterols. I couldn't find the amount of resveratrol. On Amazon, I found CholestOff, which actually has 0.9g of plant sterols. The 240 tablets, 120 servings, costs $22.22, which is 18.5 cents a day or $67.59 a year.

MonaVie Pulse is typically the same price as MonaVie Active above (around $2610, but cheaper if bought in bulk) and it too will cost you thousands more than the much obvious cheaper solution.

What about the resveratrol? Without knowing how much is in MonaVie Pulse, we can't really make a fair price comparison. There is this resveratrol, which will cost you $76.19 a year. The combination of CholestOff and this resveratrol is still a bargain at around $140 compared to spending a couple of thousand dollars and not knowing how much resveratrol you'll get.

While plant sterols have been shown to the FDA to help cholesterol levels, resveratrol remains and unknown... A couple of articles show that we might need to wait for legit evidence on resveratrol.

MonaVie M(mun) - This MonaVie juice's star ingredient is Wellmune, a patented derivative of baker's yeast from the pharmaceutical company, Biothera. Four ounces of MonaVie M(mun) has 250mg of Wellmune in it. Once again, I went to Amazon and found Immune Health Basics, which has 500mg of Wellmune. It costs $37.49 for 60 capsules or about 62.5 cents for 500mg. Since this is double the amount in MonaVie, the true cost per serving would be a little more than 31 cents. It costs $114 for a year's supply of the same amount of Immune Health Basics as you'd get in MonaVie M(mun).

The pricing of M(mun) follows that of MonaVie Active and MonaVie Pulse above, meaning that you'd save thousands by buying the capsules of Immune Health Basics.

When you do a little more research you'll find that Wellmune is also similar to beta glucans, a pill that you also might be able to find cheaply. When I last looked into Wellmune, around the time that MonaVie announced M(mun), research as to whether it was helpful was conflicting. One study of people found that they missed no more sick days than the placebo group when taking the product.

MonaVie MX - This MonaVie juice has the star ingredients of Active (glucosamine) and M(mun) Wellmune. Also, in addition to the basic 19 fruit juices in the juice it has 11 vegetables. Below, we'll cover in more detail why this isn't necessarily a good thing. As for pricing, this product like all of MonaVie juices is around $40, but in this case a few extra dollars due to having the glucosamine and the Wellmune in it.

MonaVie Essential and MonaVie Kosher - MonaVie essential seems to be a rework of "MonaVie Original" which is the basic juice with no star ingredients. MonaVie Kosher is a basic juice with no star ingredients that has been certified Kosher.

Bottom Line on MonaVie Nutrition: Any way you slice it (pun intended), MonaVie is not a good source of nutrition when compared to time-tested advice of just eating fruits and vegetables. If you are thinking about MonaVie as a dietary supplement, it represents the worst value for you dollar... and it isn't even close. The examples I gave of a single person spending thousands more than equivalent product is multiplied when you consider a family of four. That family could save an average of over $6000+ a year by replacing MonaVie's juices with products found in your drug store or on the Internet. Depending on your tax bracket, this simple decision could be the equivalent of getting a $10,000 raise tomorrow or winning a lottery that pays you $10,000 for life.

Does MonaVie Work?

While the talk of many, many testimonials may seem convincing, such testimonials are typical with any MLM product, especially health ones. The fact that you can many testimonials for dozens of other MLM products shows that these testimonials are not unique to MonaVie products... or any ingredients in those products. Instead, there's a wide variety of psychological phenomena with MLM health products that give people the perception that the products work. For more details see:
No Your MLM Health Product Does Not "Work."

The MonaVie Business Opportunity

MonaVie is sold via multi-level marketing also known as MLM. I've written about The Business of MLM (or What Gives Freddy Krueger Nightmares) before and is terrible. Here's a quick recap... click on the links to read more in detail:

  • Around 99.54% of People Lose Money in MonaVie - This analysis was done using MonaVie's Income Disclosure Statement (IDS) the last time they included the number of distributors to make such calculations possible.
  • No Barriers to Entry - Since anyone can be a distributor for usually very little money, anyone can be your direct competitor.
  • MLM Distributors Lack Control of the Business - MonaVie can take your business away whenever it feels like it for whatever reason they want. I think MJ DeMarco might have said it best in his book Millionaire Fast Lane, "I was involved in four MLM companies. Not once do I remember dictating product decisions, research and marketing, marketing restriction, rules, cost analysis or any other activity fundamental to owning a business. As a network marketer, you don't own a business - you own a job managing and creating a sales organization... MLM distributors are commissioned employees disguised as entrepreneurs."

    Below we'll get to the point about MonaVie and pyramid schemes. We'll cover how "creating a sales organization in MLM" can be considered as participating in illegal pyramid scheme.

  • MLM and the Reality of Saturation - Recruiting people into MonaVie is where the Diamonds make their money. The problem is that the market is already saturated. You simply can't go to the top of the pyramid anymore because those positions have been taken for years. In order to get there you have to build thousands of people under you and if those people wanted to be juice salesmen they would have been long before now.
  • Understanding the Churn Rate in MLM - Somewhere between 60% and 90% of distributors in MLMs leave the business every year because of the first bullet point above. They didn't make any money. MLMs replace these people with new hopefuls because their sales pitch is enticing. When MonaVie recruits someone they tell them that they too can have health and wealth for them and all their friends. Who wouldn't want that? The scheme churns through people every year with enough people quitting and joining so that the pyramid scheme never explodes past the population of the earth.

MLM distributors like say that it is up to the person to do the work and not be "Lazy." Well I'm an expert on Lazy and I can tell you that isn't the truth. In MLM, losing is not a matter of effort, it's a mathematical certainty. The circumstances surrounding the system set people up to fail.

MonaVie's Illegal Health Claims

When I first wrote about MonaVie and wondered why people would spend $45 on juice, I had no idea how the product was marketed. I was shocked as distributors left comments connecting MonaVie to helping with cancer, autism, fibromyalgia, and just about any and every other medical condition under the sun. MonaVie has not been approved by the FDA to help with such conditions making these claims illegal.

It wasn't until later that I learned that MonaVie CEO was the Vice President of Dynamic Essentials a company that madeRoyal Tondan Limu juice. The FDA warned the company about website claims to treat various diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and Attention Deficit Disorder caused their products to be in violation of the law. The company continued to sell the product and the FDA and Department of Justice fined the company millions and went as far as destroying the product. The action essentially put an end to Dynamic Essentials.

Dallin Larsen held "fireside chats" with hundreds of people. There is one "fireside" chat on Archive.org. He tells this convincing story how Dynamic Essentials is part of a publicly traded company with products in Wal-Mart and that they found this fascinating ingredient called Limu Moui. He goes on to essentially claim that limu that unique benefits to help with the system. At the 7:25 minute mark of the audio, Larsen tells of how he just came back from a tour talking to people who have used the product and tells of the stories he heard and how it has helping with asthma, arthritis, chronic fatique, fibromyalgia, lupis, migrane headaches, etc. He then goes to say that "We can't make [the claim that you aren't going to get cancer and heart disease]... I know that this product is having a benefitial impact on people's health.

MonaVie, is an identical copy-cat of Royal Tongan Limu juice, but with acai instead of limu. The illegal health claims that I've seen in the comments on my article and elsewhere on the Internet come straight from the leadership.

Newsweek did a story on MonaVie in which Dallin Larsen acknowledged that while MonaVie has an 18-person compliance team which investigates distributors making false claims, "It's next to impossible, like herding cats." In short, MonaVie opened Pandora's Box with their distribution system. The proper solution to fix this systemic problem is to distribute the product like Ocean Spray or Welch which doesn't have these problems. MonaVie refuses this logical solution that would prevent consumers from be defrauded out of their hard-earned money and still allow them to get the product to those who were interested in it.

When I found MonaVie distributor Mitch Biggs claiming that MonaVie prevents swine flu, I decided to help out MonaVie's compliance team and let them know. Mitch Biggs should know better. He was a MonaVie Emerald Executive, one of the top 166 distributors at the time, who make an average $155,000 a year. My goal was to find out how MonaVie would enforce the its policies and procedures which allow it to end a distributorship who is caught making illegal claims. Would MonaVie do what's right and make an example to show distributors that they can't be making these claims? Or would MonaVie cave, not wanting to create a rift amongst its distributors? The answer: Mitch Biggs Scams People and MonaVie Condones It.

A recent commenter suggested that MonaVie's compliance was doing its job, so I showed him this story, which is about two years ago as of this pointing (June 2012). I decided to go an look and see if MonaVie is still letting Mitch Biggs be a distributor, which lead me to this video on a local news show. It seems like Mitch and Ashley Biggs are making erroneous and deceptive claims multiple times saying that MonaVie is an "easy, convenient and tasteful, way to get your fruit every day" and "just an easy, easy, way to get your fruit." As we saw in a section above, MonaVie's Nutritional Value, this is quite untrue. The spot even took the effort to bring a vase of 13 fruits to illustrate the deception.

It may seem like I'm picking on one distributor, but this is a leading distributor who was made an example of once before and yet continues to break the law publicly. If this is the stuff that is going on in the open, imagine what is going on behind closed doors!

Some may suggest that this is an isolated case - one example of a bad seed that every industry has. That's simply untrue. It is a systematic problem which is so prevalent that Dr. Johnny Bowden's article that I mentioned at the very beginning of this article was titled, "No More Claiming MonaVie Cures Cancer!" These are the kinds of things that happens when you tell distributors that they can be millionaires if you recruit enough people to buy a juice that happens to be priced at 20 times more than other juices. The distributors have to come up with some way to market the obscenely overpriced product. They are naturally going to try to make a point that it is a value for consumers as a replacement for medicine or something seemingly expensive like buying a vase of 13 fruits.

MonaVie's Deceptive Marketing

If I were to go into depth about MonaVie's deceptive marketing, I would never finish writing this article. This article is already so long that I wonder if you'll read it. There's just too much to say. I also think I covered a lot of it above. So here I'll just give a few more examples:

In the above section, MonaVie's Nutritional Value, I went into detailed the 13-servings of fruit and ORAC score myth. That's a typical example of the marketing to keep in mind. Here are a few others:

  • 19 fruits in the juice - MonaVie adds all these juices because the public has a perception that more juices is better. That's not necessarily true. Regular readers know that a mutual fund with more stocks does not necessarily out-perform those with fewer stocks. A pizza with a 7-cheese blend is not necessarily better than one with a 3-cheese blend. In fact, the more ingredients, the easier it is to dilute the ingredients that MonaVie touts like acai. When you have 18 other fruits in addition to acai, the amount of acai could be less than 6% and still be the first ingredient on the list. However, if MonaVie only had 2 fruits and acai was listed first, you'd know that you are getting at least 50% acai in every ounce.
  • Freeze-dried acai - For years MonaVie touted the amount of freeze-dried acai because it had a huge ORAC score. The reason it got such a high score is the fact that water was taken out, which allowed them to pack more powder per ounce. However, it was shown that MonaVie is less than 2% freeze-dried acai, meaning that even with a high score, there wasn't enough of it to make a significant difference.

MonaVie's "Studies"

MonaVie relies heavily on their Scientific Advisory Board, specifically Dr. Alexander Schauss. Schauss has a long list of reputation problems. One of them was that he faked his credentials and got a mail-order PhD degree from California Coast University. MonaVie pitched Schauss as an expert on acai, but they are the only ones who recognized him for anything like this. The reality is that Schauss was the supplier of his OptiAcai brand to MonaVie.

Schauss, through his AIBMR Life Sciences, pumped out a lot of "research" which could fool some people into thinking that there was actual science. In fact, MonaVie product specialist Erica Bryant wrote distributors to tell them that AIBMR is the only source of that they should use. Some of this research led to ridiculous papers such as this “Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Study” on MonaVie by Schauss. It doesn't take a scientist to see that it was made for the specific purpose of giving distributors fuel to recruit more people. Tellingly, the final conclusion of the study made mention of another study that showed that eating fruit had positive results as well.

MonaVie: An Illegal Pyramid Scheme?

I believe MonaVie is an illegal pyramid scheme. Here's why:

How you can help put an end to the scam

The best way to put an end to this scam is to go to the FTC Complaint Assistant and file a complaint. A recent article on CNBC had comments from the FTC saying that few people file complaints on these schemes and thus they rarely put in the resources to investigate them. There are two reasons why there are so few complaints:

  • People are brainwashed from the beginning that the system "works", and "the only variable is you." Thus people feel as if it is their own failure rather than recognizing the system was mathematically set up to fail over 99% of people from the beginning.
  • The FTC doesn't do anything. You leave a complaint and that's the end of it. The complainant gets no follow-up from the FTC and there's never any evidence that the complaint is ever read. It's fundamentally terrible system... but that's what we have to work with.

With that said, if you're as upset as I am about people being lied to and defrauded out of their money, please leave a complaint. If you do, please sent me a quick mail. This way, I'll have an idea of the minimum number of complaints that MonaVie is getting.

MonaVie Mynt

Update: MonaVie has started marketing to college students and those who have recently graduated. These are probably the worst candidates for such overpriced MLM products. They have little income and often high student loans. I believe that MLMs have nowhere else to turn as the general population know that it's a scam. I think they believe they will catch them early before they've gathered the wisdom to know to stay away.

I wrote a whole article about MonaVie Mynt.

[Editor's Note: This article itself is a constant work in progress. I didn't have the space to get into explaining the scamming behind MonaVie's MORE charity. Publication deadlines force me to publish this without proofreading. In the future, I hope to go into more of MonaVie's products like its RVL line of weight loss, which is a copy of other other MLMs and also a terrible value compared to the equivalents in stores. However, at this point, it does more to help people to get this information in their hands quickly and that means saving some of the editing for another day.]

Last updated on May 31, 2014.

This post deals with:

,

... and focuses on:

MonaVie

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Archived Comments

It seems that with over 6000 comments people are finding this page slow to load and difficult to leave additional comments on. You can find a nearly complete archive of comments here. and can click the "Older Comments" link above for the most recent ones. I highly recommend reading them before posting. There's a high chance your concern has been addressed already.

6,312 Responses to “MonaVie Scam Exposed!”

  1. Susan says:

    Lazyman:

    You said “I’m just the messenger relaying the FTC guidelines are stated here. Once again, you are welcome to your opinion, but you give no basis for why anyone should trust it. Your repeated errors discredit your opinion. I’ve worked hard to explain why I stand by the FTC’s guidelines.”

    The FTC appears to have nearly a half a billion dollar yearly budget in the federally approved budget numbers. You claim they have no money to go after MLM violators.

    Half a billion dollars is alot of money. If there were so many violators, I would think this budget would be sufficient to at least sent out non-compliance letters that would then show up in their database.

    Fact is, there are very few in their database. Ergo, the business are in compliance with federal law.

    FYI: Your captcha is very annoying. It fails probably 1 time in 3.

  2. Lazy Man says:

    It most certainly does matter that car dealerships are legitimate companies legally marketing legitimate products and MonaVie appeared to be, using the FTC guidelines, an illegal pyramid scheme based on pay-to-play requirement to buy $45 flavored water.

    I do not know about MonaVie promising bonuses and not being able to pay them, but it was collapsing in July 2008 according to top distributors as outlined here: “From July 2008 – January 2009 my MonaVie business fell back around 40%. It stabalized [sic] from January through May. In June of this year to current my business has gone backwards consistently every single week an additional 30%. I watched my Blue Diamonds [sic] house get Foreclosed on, another Blue Diamonds car was repossessed. No one on my team including me was qualifying rank. At our Hotel events, I was calling up all the Blue Diamonds, Hawaiian Blue Diamonds and Black Diamonds and no one was making anywhere close to the income disclosure statement.”

    It says nothing about MonaVie refusing to pay them money earned. It says that they were no longer qualifying rank. If they weren’t paying money the lawsuit cited in that article would be the distributor suing MonaVie for breech of contract. It wasn’t.

    Maybe MonaVie also didn’t pay out bonuses, but that’s in addition to the scheme imploding as recruiting people to sell $45 flavored water isn’t a legitimate business.

    And it’s fine to explain that the binary matrix has a failing where it can collapse… that’s a great explanation of an illegal pyramid scheme.

  3. Lazy Man says:

    Hebrbalife, a single MLM, has billions in profits every year. They can tie up a case in court for years with each side burning millions on lawyers.

    The FTC does not have nearly a half billion budget. It’s less than a 1/3 billion or $293 million in 2015. I’ll win twice that after lump sum and taxes in PowerBall tonight ;-). Even a whole $300 million isn’t going to go very far against Herbalife.

    And the FTC knows it doesn’t have the budget either. They said they couldn’t battle FreeCreditReport’s 70M budget in 2007 – “The FTC is not buying any advertising time for the spoof. ‘We don’t have that kind of budget,’ Wood said.”

    The FTC doesn’t operate by sending out warning letters like the FDA. The FTC usually keeps its intentions hidden until it strikes. For example, when the FTC shut down Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing, the pyramid scheme claiming to be an MLM company didn’t receive a public warning that I was aware of. Same for when the FTC shut down Vemma.

    Both those companies operated for around ten years before getting shut down. In year 9 of their existence, you would have said, “Hey the FTC didn’t shut them down, they must be legal.” That’s simply not true. The FTC’s enforcement of their guidelines is the issue. And that’s what the the former FTC economist wants to fix the broken system.

  4. Vogel says:

    The final nail in Dallin Larsen’s coffin.
    http://www.sltrib.com/news/4164468-155/multilevel-marketer-monavie-settles-employee-lawsuit

    I have mixed feelings about the settlement, as it benefited a few hundred pricks at the top of the pyramid — the same people who were instrumental in scamming thousands of people.

  5. Lazy Man says:

    Couldn’t it have benefited call center and IT employees and other people who really weren’t in on the scam? If Marsh and Larsen and being forced to put $30K in their retirement accounts, it might be the only good thing that could have come from the company.

  6. Candace says:

    ***If only someone could have seen.this.coming. ;-)

    Rewind with me…can you hear the chants of “I am an independent business owner with an MLM business, I am NOT an employee of MV”…now fast forward to “Judge awards settlement to “MV employees” and now all those independent business owners are hoping to call themselves employees.

    It’s ALL dirty, IMHO.

  7. Strangely says:

    I don’t know as a percentage how many were sucked or forced into the ESOP – but it says 420 folks will be better off. However, 420 multiplied by the avg payout of 30k comes to $12.6m, far short of the $19.8m settlement…is that the legal fees…?

    For me, all employees at MV are culpable and many will be just glad to have had an income for a few years followed by a 30k payoff and all without that nasty public publicity, eh? They must be feeling like the train drivers into Auschwitz.

  8. Lazy Man says:

    Strangely! Candace! Let’s get the band back together!

    I’m not sure how many people read my most recent articles, but I think you might be interested in this one I published earlier this week:

    Victory Day Over MLM Scams

  9. lattimore says:

    this is absolutely shocking news

  10. Lazy Man says:

    Lattimore, what’s your friend Barry up to nowadays? I still have not been attacked by a bear.

  11. Vogel says:

    Lazy Man, Candace, Strangely, Lattimore – the dream team reunion! Now that Monavie is a distant memory, relegated to the ash heap of snakeoil/pyramid scheme history, I raise my glass and salute you all. It’s safe to say that our combined efforts were instrumental in bringing about Monavie’s demise. A mitzvah!

  12. Strangely says:

    He he. Remembering the bear….

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