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Are DoTERRA Essential Oils a Scam?

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Update/TL;DR: There appears to be a great deal of fraud with DoTERRA that has gotten the FDA's attention. In addition, the FTC warns MLMs with overpriced products may be a pyramid scheme. You can pay ~$68 for 1.5 ounces (45ml) of DoTERRA lavender oil or spend the same amount for 16 ounces of NOW Lavender Oil. The NOW Lavender product is extremely well-reviewed showing that it is quality product and not a cheap knock-off. Your money goes more than 10x further with the non-MLM/pyramid scheme version.

Are DoTERRA Essential Oils A Scam

Are DoTERRA Essential Oils A Scam

For a few years now people have asked me about doTERRA essential oils. The first was Candace who was a major contributor in the 6000+ comments of my MonaVie article. That was back in March of 2012. A few months after that someone by the name of Laura emailed me about the company.

In the last few months, I've received a couple more emails about essential oils from close friends who follow the blog. One was LisaRob a frequent commenter on my old LifeVantage Protandim article. Another was one of my favorite personal finance bloggers who sent me an email with the subject "The Wife got ripped off". It turns out that in both these case, they were talking about Young Living's essential oils and not doTERRA's.

I don't want to unfairly lump the companies together, but there are clearly very obvious similarities such as the essential oils and the MLM structure which are increasingly becoming exposed as pyramid schemes in recent years. (Some examples include WSJ, Harper's, and Forbes calling them out. And that's not to begin to cover the Herbalife investigation from every regulator under the sun.)

With apologies to those asking about Young Living, I'll focus on doTERRA today and leave Young Living for sometime in the future. If you are interested in Young Living, I suggest reading this anyway, it's most likely the same think. It will be like learning about baseball by watching the Yankees instead of the Red Sox. They are different teams, but the game is still the same.

Let's dig into doTERRA, shall we.

When Candace emailed me back in 2012, it was to tell me that she was recently made aware of this company and their products. In her research she found that doTERRA was claiming that their products were certified as therapeutic grade by the FDA and that they show a seal with registered trademark CPTG (Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade) as proof. It's brilliantly covered in this article that the CPTG trademark is one that doTERRA created and has nothing to do with the FDA at all.

That article even shows that doTERRA customer support is lying to people about the FDA giving them the label of CPTG. Quite clearly the FDA wouldn't waste their time giving doTERRA a label that doTERRA invented. It would be like me register a trademark for World's Best Blogger and then claiming that a consortium of Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and Facebook gave me that label. Sorry, but...


We can go a little further and review doTERRA's FAQ on CPTG (Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade):

Q: doTERRA's essential oils are trademarked as "CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade™". What does this term mean, and what evidence is there to prove the efficacy and purity of your oils?

A: doTERRA's essential oils are trademarked and registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office as CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade™. This term means that our essential oils will always maintain the highest quality standard in therapeutic grade essential oils for purity and efficacy.

It seems that over the years, they've switched the "certification" from the FDA to the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). However, the USPTO isn't in the business of doing certification of essential oils... just like they aren't in the business of determining who is the best blogger. McDonalds has trademarked the "I'm Loving It" slogan, but it doesn't mean that everyone actually loves McDonalds. BMW has trademarked "The Ultimate Driving Experience", but it doesn't mean that the USPTO has declared the BMW's driving experience to be beyond all others.

The trademarked term of CPTG (Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade) is simply their marketing slogan designed to confuse consumers into thinking that is has been certified and that therapeutic grade essential oils exist. They don't.

A research article here says the following:

CERTIFIED PURE THERAPEUTIC GRADE:
This is a relatively new trademark by a multi-level marketing company. It gives the appearance of being approved by some kind of higher authority and it has been said that the company states it is a FDA approved to use this label. According to Elston (2009), 'This registered word mark has not been provided to them by the FDA as they claim and is meaningless in proving that an outside certifying body has declared or designated that DoTERRA's essential oils are certified pure therapeutic grade. DoTERRA, LLC owns the right to exclusive use of the mark (however not the exclusive right to the actual words 'Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade' which is revealing). This seal or word mark is nothing more than a commercial trademark that they have registered and paid a fee for."

This is really all I need to know to form the opinion that the company a scam. The definition of scam is a "confidence trick." This appears to be confidence trick by doTERRA in creating and using a marketing term with the word "certified" in it, when it hasn't been certified by anyone and "therapeutic grade", when the FDA hasn't approved it as being therapy for anything.

I really shouldn't go further, but there's another reason why I wrote this article. I noticed that a blog I sometimes read called Pick the Brain published an article of: 3 Health Issues to Mitigate Using Essential Oils.

That title clued me in right away. This was another MLM with distributors illegally claiming that their dietary supplement can help with medical conditions without the FDA's approval. Sure enough, if you look at the author's (Heather Koenig's) bio at the bottom and go to her website (EssentialOilsUS.com), she is a doTerra salesperson. You are looking at a cleverly designed advertisement.

If a product can help with a condition, it can be certified with the FDA just like calcium and vitamin D are for bone health. Alas, it doesn't look like doTERRA has gone through the process which tells me they believe in their product to prove the claims.

The article on Pick the Brain was almost comical. The author suggested that essential oils can help with weight loss, but gave no reason why. There was no research presented. It was simply stated to be an alternative to popping pills. Well, carrying my lucky rabbit's foot in my pocket is an alternative too... it's just not a good one. There's no scientific basis behind it... just like essential oils. The rest of the weight loss section was filler. There was no information about essential oils and their efficacy. Instead it was about it taking patience and endurance to lose weight. Maybe the author should have written an article about that instead of essential oils.

Unfortunately, it only goes downhill from there as the author suggests that people treat mental conditions with essential oils. That's the kind of advice that could lead to suicide... very irresponsible.

The clincher (do we need any more evidence?) is this article on Science-based Medicine on doTERRA. Dr. Harriet Hall covers in detail how the claims made on the website are vague... vague enough to not get them in trouble with FDA. However, the claims are also specific enough to lead distributors to make illegal health claims. For example, "supporting a healthy insulin response" is likely to be stretched to "helps treat diabetes!" In fact, here is a website making that claim.

This leads to doTERRA's message. They explicitly say on their website, "This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease." Their salesforce explicitly pitches the products to treat diseases.

It's insanity.

In fact it is so insane that the FDA sent warning letters to both DoTERRA Essential Oils and Young Living Essential Oils on the same day: September 22, 2014.

As a side note, Dr. Harriet Hall's article refers to the Young Living's Essential Oils with information about its founder, Gary Young, and accounts of his fraud and extensive arrest record including how he "contributed to the death of his own child by performing an underwater delivery and holding the newborn infant underwater for an hour." Once again, we'll save that for a future article on Young Living if we get around to it (I have to be honest, it took me more than 2 years to get to this article).

It looks like doTERRA is one of the many MLM companies where they lead distributors to make illegal health claims. Once again we can apply the logic and science that shows No, the MLM Health Product Does Not Work. I invite doTERRA to prove me and Dr. Harriet Hall wrong by getting the products approved by the FDA for conditions like calcium and vitamin D are for bone health.

Update:

People in the comments have criticized me for not trying the products. This is very flawed logic in health products for the reasons I cite this in this article. (There's no point in rewriting all the logic here.) This Christmas I got this ZAQ Noor Essential Oil Diffuser and this NOW Foods Essential Oils 10-Oil Variety Pack Sampler - 1oz Each. I've tried them and they smell great and work just like the ZAQ diffuser company suggests. A few drops go a long, long way and each 1 oz bottle should last for 150 uses (20 drops is equal to 1ml... there are 30mls in an ounce... so the 600 drops equals 150 total 4-drop uses.) At $50 for the 10 bottles, I paid $5 an ounce for the 100% pure, well-reviewed NOW products that work great (yes I'm stressing the quality, because it is a quality product).

It makes no sense to spend 5x more for 1/2 the product (15mls or a 1/2 ounce) for the DoTerra label. As a consumer advocate, I have to say that your money is best spent buying what you want individual from cheaper vendors where you get 10 times more product for your dollar.

Other Great Reading

Damning Evidence That Young Living and DoTERRA’s Essential Oils are Adulterated and Report Used in Young Living Farms Case Against DoTERRA Suspect.

Last updated on September 3, 2016.

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268 Responses to “Are DoTERRA Essential Oils a Scam?”

  1. Lazy Man says:

    I’m fine with people spending money how they see fit. I’m not fine with people lying to sell snake oil as part of a pyramid scheme. They only rabidly defend it, because they need to in order to continue to recruit people into the scheme.

  2. Alaina says:

    Thanks for this article. I got invited to a “girls night” tonight only to find out it was a presentation for this crap.

    Are there some benefits to these oils? Maybe. But it seems pretty outrageous and irresponsible to claim it as a cure for their laundry list of ailments.

    It also scares me the mob mentality and the people who defend it/buy into it. I wouldn’t trust an MLM no matter what they were selling. And the principle of selling to friends and everyone you know is dirty. But this seems almost dangerous to me. I hope doterra gets slapped with a big lawsuit someday and goes bankrupt. Thanks for the article for shedding more light on it in the meantime.

  3. kalani says:

    A friend of mine coined these oils “Suburban Witchcraft”, which I think describes perfectly whats going on here.

  4. francis says:

    Great. My wife just bought a load of this snake oil. Most definitely a pyramid scheme creating a culture that breeds lies in order to create sales.

  5. Mykayla says:

    My stepmom is a DoTERRA salesperson and has been for a few years now, and she is always trying to force me to use this crap; even choosing it over actually taking me to a doctor. When I was younger I always refused because I can’t stand the smell. Now I’m 19 and I can see how ridiculous and dangerous it really is. I agree wholeheartedly with the term “Suburban Witchcraft”

  6. Great article! I use essential oils to scent my soap, and I’m always researching. There are so many bogus and harmful claims criculating about essential oils. One that I find particularly disturbing is that the companies you mention also tout ingestion as being beneficial. This can actually result in death. MLM misanthropes are completely scary!

  7. Lupita says:

    Thank you so much for posting this article. I was looking into buying essential oils and I noticed DoTerra being 5 times more expensive! A friend gave me a sample and I got more from NOW brand; so I didn’t notice a difference on the quality. But everything you are saying makes so much sense about the why! The MLM, Pyramid Scheme, lies, deception, wanting you to join, etc, etc! Now I know what’s the difference, LOL!!! THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!!!

  8. Roxie says:

    There are many many companies producing essential oils. Like ANY product there are ‘good’ ones and not so good ones. I have used several different brands and doTerra is my favorite. They are food grade and have so many tests run on each herb used, it amazes me that any pass the stringent inspections and tests run. I do have knowledge of the companies beginning and I do know there are those out there with a ‘axe to grind’ or you may say ‘disgruntled’. This is NOT a ‘fly by night’ or a ‘snake oil’ business as some have said. Do your homework, investigate for yourself before you slander someone’s reputation, business, and/or hard work. I would and DO recommend doTerra to anyone interested in a good quality EO. Remember, even Jesus had those were intimidated by Him and crucified Him because of their own insecurities. ;) Have a blessed day oiling.

  9. Lazy Man says:

    I don’t know of any not so good essential oils. There might be some out there, but all you need is one great one like Now (see the Amazon reviews) at 1/10th the cost to make DoTERRA irrelevant. It simply doesn’t matter if DoTERRA is also good, it is ten times more money.

    If you have the choice between to types of 93 octane gas are you going to pay the one costs $2.50 a gallon or the one that costs $25.00 a gallon?

    I always recommend that people do their homework. The results of my article was me doing my homework. If you have other homework for me to add please do.

    And yes, MLM companies are attempting to intimidate me with frivolous lawsuits because of their own insecurities. Read more about how you can help me voice my opinion and exercise my freedom of speech here: http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/le-vel-brands-is-suing-me-to-silence-criticism/

  10. Julie G. says:

    Lazy –

    After reading this article that I link I came back to your site to see if you had written anything on Doterra. And here it is!

    I do t think you linked this article but it adds further evidence of Doterra’s misleading marketing ploys.

    https://www.naha.org/assets/uploads/The_Quality_of_Essential_Oils_Journal.pdf

  11. Lazy Man says:

    Good find Julie. I’ll add it to the article.

  12. PokeyBug says:

    “Remember, even Jesus had those were intimidated by Him and crucified Him because of their own insecurities.”

    You are using Christ to defend an overpriced essential oil company. STAHP! That is belittling the sacrifice that Jesus made for you, and He won’t thank you for it.

  13. Andrea says:

    Hi, I’m a doTerra user, not a seller. I get allergies and severe migraines and the doTerra oils I use help me a great deal. I could use other oils but I don’t because I have more faith in products that are 3rd party tested for quality and honesty in ingredient labeling, which doTerra does (other’s probably do, too). Among those that are tested higher in quality, doTerra is cheaper for me. I researched other companies and compared what I would pay and that are not MLM but found I couldn’t afford them. When it comes to what I put in and on my body (not akin to choosing gasoline), quality and verified ingredients are important to me. I will say that I am turned off by the MLM aspect of doTerra but as far as the benefit and cost, it has worked well for me. No more allergy meds and headache’s/migraines are relieved if I catch them early on with oils. Just thought I’d add my two cents as a user.

  14. Lazy Man says:

    Andrea,

    I’m confused. What exactly are you allergic to? Which doTerra oils are you claiming help you with allergies and/or migraines?

    I have used essential oils daily for months now and I’ve experienced… good smells.

    As I mentioned in the article, pure is pure. If you are the type who question that, I certainly hope you don’t ever eat food at restaurants where purity is far from guaranteed. I hope you don’t breathe air in an office building as that air would not be tested for quality either.

    I certainly hope you don’t take any supplements as there are reports like these in the NY Times.

    Which non-MLM essential oil could you not afford? Can you supply some brands, because I’d like to find the ones that you can’t afford. My research shows that the MLM ones are the most expensive ones that people would find most difficult to afford… hence my confusion.

    If you are turned off by the MLM aspect, I would at least hope you’d recommend that people by all their doTerra products from Ebay which avoids that.

  15. Camilla says:

    Essential oils can be very good but the way said company works seems very scammy at first appearance, where they try to sell you “packages” and “registration fees” and setting you up with some free samples.
    If you are serious about essential oils (and boy do I love them) then I recommend looking somewhere else….

  16. Mary says:

    It’s easy to write an article on something by quoting other articles and claiming foul. MLMs are everywhere. Even Tupperware is an MLM but it is still a good product. Distributors of DoTerra are not making illegal claims as you state. If they are following the company’s policy that is. Essential oils are easily misunderstood by folks who haven’t done their research. I am curious to know if you used any of them or just made assumptions. Things aren’t as cut and dried as you may think when it comes to Essential oils and their quality and potency.

  17. Lazy Man says:

    Mary, it’s easy to criticize a consumer advocate. In fairness, the FDA claimed foul as cited in the article. If distributors are following the company’s policy, I don’t think the FDA would send such warning letters… is that fair?

    As I pointed out in the article, I’ve bought and used essential oils. They smell great in my diffuser. They are great quality as per thousands of Amazon reviews and listed as 100% pure (as best I can recall).

    It’s easy to play the “are they quality?” card against Now’s product for 1/10th the price, but I’ve showed that they have thousands of top reviews on Amazon for their essential oils. They have the same for many of their supplements if I recall.

  18. Vogel says:

    Mary said: “It’s easy to write an article on something by quoting other articles and claiming foul.”

    Easy for some people, but I bet you couldn’t write a cogent compelling article if your life depended on it.

    Mary said: “MLMs are everywhere. Even Tupperware is an MLM but it is still a good product.”

    Nice attempt at distraction. Tupperware has nothing to do with Doh-Terra, and even Tupperware’s CEO admits that the MLM industry is rife with impropriety and pyramid schemes:

    “CEO Rick Goings said, ‘Direct selling left us, because the industry became dominate by buying clubs and what looked like pyramid schemes’.”
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/100366770

    Mary said: “Distributors of DoTerra are not making illegal claims as you state. If they are following the company’s policy that is.”

    That’s just dumb. It’s like saying that Americans do not commit crimes, IF they are following the law. We all know full well that DoLTerra distributors are constantly making illegal and unsubstantiated claims.

    Mary said: “Essential oils are easily misunderstood by folks who haven’t done their research.”

    That certainly applies to the suckers involved with DoltError; not as much to the population at large.

    Mary said: “I am curious to know if you used any of them or just made assumptions.”

    Nope, since trying Doperra would require giving my money to hucksters for an overpriced product that fuels a pyramid scheme.

    Mary said: “Things aren’t as cut and dried as you may think when it comes to Essential oils and their quality and potency.”

    Ooo, the hidden mystery argument. Please enlighten us MLM drone.

  19. Renata says:

    THANK YOU for this! I started seeing a new doctor, who (as it turns out) pushes doTERRA. To the point where that is all he prescribes. I thought my red flags were going up because I was being a “baby” about how expensive these supplements and oils are. I didn’t order what he prescribed, so I started getting calls from his office wondering why. That creeped me out, I don’t recall a doctor ever checking with the pharmacy to see if I filled my prescription… Since I don’t want to deal with the embarrassment of admitting that I don’t trust him enough to spend $200 a month (that I don’t have), I will likely just quietly find another doctor. Thanks, again, for this article. It showed me my gut is trustworthy.

  20. Michael says:

    Thank you for this excellent article. Medical professional here (physician) and I’ve treated three patients this year who have undone the work of their endocrinologist looking for an alternative to taking actual FDA approved medications for thyroid disorders. The results were near fatal in one case. The vendors that they purchased their doterra oils from claimed that using the oils instead of what their doctors prescribed, would be a natural alternative that would provide better results. The truth is, they don’t. The oils smell nice and that’s it. Oils may make you feel nice because of their pretty scent but are NOT substitutions for actual medicine. The aforementioned vendor was so far down the pyramid and so far removed from the parent company, that no one was going to get in trouble for giving out bad medical information. Bottom line: if you want to smell nice use the oils and that’s fine. But do not except these as valid medical treatments. One of the three patients that I mentioned above eded up in the hospital with a near toxic goiter. Not to offend anyone that sells oils and considers themselves and herbalist, but my 20+ years studying and practicing medicine that is backed up by over a century of strong medical literature carries far more weight then a two week essential oil course or an online certificate. This is fact. Thank you and please keep yourselves safe from the snake oil salesmans of Facebook.

  21. Gin says:

    Hello!
    This article is wonderful. I never leave comments ever….but after reading this article and all your responses—>>> just wanted to say thanks! Body wraps are my current MLM pet peeve but this is a close second.

  22. Jenn says:

    Hi, thanks for the information on DoTerra. I was introduced to the products this weekend when someone convinced me to do a quick “compass” report of what my body is missing. I was fine with the $10 charge for that, but as soon as she mentioned the registration fee and the outrageous prices, my spidey-senses were tingling. She also suggested that I ingest the oils, and informed me that they are the only oils on the market that are FDA approved. I thanked her and walked away. I suggest you do the same.

  23. BeOpen says:

    It’s easy to write an article with a closed mind. It’s also easy to get fooled with a mind that is too open. Maybe you should try to write an article in the same way about a pharmaceutical company that provides a certain medicine. Maybe in a couple of years you may find out that their slick marketing and lobby at the FDA had you fooled… But all that time you were taking their toxins and poisening your body. Ain’t it weird that we try to cure ourselves with toxins from very, very, very rich companies?
    Try writing about this kind of swindle, instead of these easy targets backed up by the lobby of pharmaceutical companies.
    Remember… it’s all about the money.

  24. Lazy Man says:

    Interesting name “BeOpen”, you seem to not want to “BeOpen” yourself. There are enough other people writing about the pharmaceutical industry and I haven’t found enough writing about MLM and specific MLM companies. To me it isn’t weird that we wouldn’t try to cure ourselves with products that are undergo a scientific, clinical process to work. And hey, not too many people get polio or TB nowadays, so they seem to be doing a lot right.

  25. […] Analysis by Lazyman and Money. […]

  26. Jennifer Cassie says:

    I have to disagree with this article. I do sell but I also use on my family, which ivlude my 3 children. Fda is a multi billion dollar company, does that really mean that there medicine is always good?
    Look at all the side effects and lawsuits they go through. We are actually now health canada approved on 20 of our oils. If you were told that it is going to cure cancer or going to cure altimers then the person that was teaching the class was not properly trained and should not be working for our company. I have seen first hand the benifits to these amazing oils, but just like drugs they have to be used properly. I have 2 nurses on my team and have done a lot of research and I am taking a aromatherapy coarse. How can I truly help people use these oils properly if I don’t know how myself. Yes doTERRA is a mlm company not denying that, but that does not make them a bad company. DoTERRA could have went straight to the store and sold that way but they chose not to,would rather have people like myself be able to deminstrate on how they are used and give samples. I went to purchase a lemon oil in a store, which I will not name becouse I am not about knocking companies expecially ones I do not know enough about.Anyways I baught this oil and they did not tell me how to use it or the cautions that they do have nothing. In my opinion not everyone should sell them . That lady should have Atleast told me that should I have got oil in my eyes not to put water,had I of not been trained properly I would have went straight for the water. I am not trying to push my company on you or say buy our products bit do not just jump to conclusions about the quality over one persons blog. If anyone would really like to sample our product message me for more info and I would be happy to share with you. Have a great day?

    [Editor’s Note: Promotional material from Jennifer is removed.]

  27. kelly says:

    Is it “TRUE”? the labeling industry in the US allows a product that contains 100% ,,,let’s say LAVENDER OIL ( 1%),,,, then ADD a “filler oil”@ 99%,,, to claim “CONTAINS 100% Lavender Oil….. AS LONG AS THE BOTTLE HAS (100% Lavender oil) in it,,, they can MISS LEAD you into thinking the WHOLE BOTTLE CONTAINS “100% Lavender?

  28. jennifer says:

    Yes Kelly it is absulutly true that they can. By law there only has to be a certain percent in each bottle to call them selves pure. People can say that we are all scammed and other products are just as good. I am with a group that actually testes other bottles and I hate to tell you that you are wrong. If you get oils off the Internet do u actually know where they are coming from and what’s inside. You can say they are more expensive but there are a number of reasons why doterra rises above others. If you buy an essential oil out of a retail store or the Internet are they going to tell you the cautions or show you how to use them. That is the reason doTERRA went this way. Word of mouth is a very powerful thing, you would take your friends or families word before you took some average Joe right. doTERRA thought it would be better to actually be able to show you how the product works and explain how doterra is where it is today. We are are the #1 essential oil company. I am not going to sit here and knock other companies becouse that is just not my style, I just warn you whatever company you use make sure the quality really is there. Ask them where it is harvested? What type of year? There are so many factures in what makes the value go up or down on an oil. If there were so many red flags in doTERRA why were they just health canada approved. There is no scientific proof that backs up your article. It is based Strickland on your opinion. If anyone would like real information or studies done or doctors articles send me your email or add my closed group on essential oils facebook. [Editor’s Note: Contact information deleted. Jennifer, please don’t try to take conversations private. This isn’t the place for your sale’s pitch. We ate only a successful company today becouse we are able to show that infact our oils do help and they are great quality, so please so not base your opinion on a article that is just one guys opinion that has not even infact tried the oils and is going off the mlm side and that’s all he really has. I wI’ll not use any other company on myself or my children and I have not used any medication in 4 months. That’s my opinion though I am not a doctor and I did go to my doctor before I started using them as well. I am happy with my choice aND becouse of it I now have more knowledge on oils and how to use them properly.

  29. Vogel says:

    Jennifer Cassie said: “I have to disagree with this article.”

    No, you don’t “have to”. But since you did anyway, it would have been nice if you had delineated precisely what it is that you disagree with instead of just creating straw men to attack.

    Jennifer Cassie said: “Fda (sic) is a multi billion dollar company, does that really mean that there (sic) medicine is always good?”

    (a) The FDA is not a company; (b) the FDA doesn’t make or sell medicine. Your question is pointless and ignorant.

    Jennifer Cassie said: “Look at all the side effects and lawsuits they go through.”

    Why? Drug side effects have nothing to with DoTerra essential oils. People are more than willing to risk a side effect (especially mild ones) in order to cure or alleviate a disease. DoTerra’s products don’t cure or alleviate diseases.

    Jennifer Cassie said: “If you were told that it is going to cure cancer or going to cure altimers (sic) then the person that was teaching the class was not properly trained and should not be working for our company.”

    What’s “altimers”? Did you mean Alzheimer’s disease? Do you realize how absurd it is for someone so woefully lacking in knowledge to be dispensing advice? Aside from that, we all agree that DoTerra’s distributors shouldn’t be making misleading and illegal claims about disease treatment, and yet they do, and the company takes no action. The article is critical of such practices and yet you prefaced your comment by complaining about how you disagree with the article. There’s no rhyme or reason to your approach.

    Jennifer Cassie said: “I have seen first hand the benifits (sic) to these amazing oils, but just like drugs they have to be used properly.”

    Firstly, why bother stating that the products have benefits and are “amazing” without providing any details?

    Second, it is extremely misleading for you to directly compare DoTerra’s products with drugs. You could have said “just like a hammer, they have to be used properly,” but instead you went with a purposely misleading statement likening them to drugs. And yet you wonder why people condemn your turd of a company?

    Jennifer Cassie said: “I have 2 nurses on my team and have done a lot of research and I am taking a (sic) aromatherapy coarse (sic).”

    So let’s recap. You have the writing and reasoning skills of a third-grader; you can’t spell to save your life; you don’t know the meaning of the word “paragraph”; you have deluded notions about what the FDA does; and you seem to think that taking an aromatherapy course is an educational credential. Do you still wonder why people scoff at the simpletons who sell and relentlessly hype DoTerra products?

    Jennifer Cassie said: “How can I truly help people use these oils properly if I don’t know how myself.”

    But you seem to know nothing, so I can’t imagine what kind of help you could possibly offer anyone. Besides, what kind of help does someone need to know how to apply a dab of oil behind their ear, and wouldn’t a simple product instruction sheet take care of that? You provide no value whatsoever.

    Jennifer Cassie said: “Yes doTERRA is a mlm company not denying that, but that does not make them a bad company.”

    Well, yes, in fact it really does. The MLM pyramid system with its multiple levels of distributor payouts (most of it going to a select few at the top level) ensures very high overhead, which necessarily translates to horribly overpriced products. Horribly overpriced products are next to impossible to sell unless they are hyped using deception; for instance, telling people that the products are miraculous and do “amazing” things, or that they can get rich selling them.

    So to recap, BS overpriced products sold deceptively. Got it?

    Jennifer Cassie said: “DoTERRA could have went straight to the store and sold that way but they chose not to,would rather have people like myself be able to deminstrate (sic) on how they are used and give samples.”

    In theory DoTerra could have chosen to sell their products in retail stores, assuming any retailer would be stupid enough to stock them, but the products would never sell because they would be situated next to similar products that sell for 10% or less of the cost of DoTerra oils. The only way they can sell the products at such an unjustifiably high price is via the MLM model and with a healthy dollop of BS.

    Jennifer Cassie said: “I went to purchase a lemon oil in a store, which I will not name becouse (sic) I am not about knocking companies expecially (sic) ones I do not know enough about. Anyways I baught (sic) this oil and they did not tell me how to use it or the cautions that they do have nothing. In my opinion not everyone should sell them . That lady should have Atleast (sic) told me that should I have got oil in my eyes not to put water,had I of not been trained properly I would have went straight for the water.”

    So, sifting through the fluff, what you’re saying is that, in contrast with the way retail products are sold, you bring value to the equation because you’re there to tell customers to not put DoTerra oil in their eyes or try to wash it out with water? That’s pretty worthless. A package insert/instruction sheet would accomplish the same thing without the need for someone like you to suck out a commission payment from the transaction.

    Jennifer Cassie said: “I am not trying to push my company on you or say buy our products bit (sic) do not just jump to conclusions about the quality over one persons (sic) blog. If anyone would really like to sample our product message me for more info and I would be happy to share with you. Have a great day? (sic)”

    So to recap, you prefaced your comment by saying that you disagree with the article, and then you proceeded to spew a bunch of illiterate nonsense that addressed precisely none of the points expressed in the article. And then to add insult injury, you say that you’re not here to push the company or its products, but then in the next sentence you start offering samples and requesting people to message you. That’s just dazzlingly dumb!

    I hope you realize that rather than demonstrating any deficiencies with the blog article, all you did was to reinforce the perception of DoTerra salespeople as clueless pawns.

  30. Esther says:

    Young living saved me when conventional doctors said I was in the “normal range” of EVERYTHING!!! I was led to a better doctor as well and now am on the road to healing and living better being more balanced and happy. I no longer depend on big pharmaceutical companies and all the side effects. My husband was convinced they were snake oils too until he had a toothache one day. I put a drop of thieves oil on a Q-tip and it took the pain right away till we could get him to the dentist next day or when he stepped wrong and DoTerra’s deep blue made his hurt foot feel better than the non-hurt foot. I am not a seller or trying to sell. I joined for the benefits. Different strokes, I guess. Be careful using other oils as I have tried them too and they aren’t recommended for topical or internal use. YL’s peppermint clears my sinuses and helps with my headaches daily!! No need for advil or tylenol. I just discovered DoTerra and am switching. I have been getting better results. Thanks for reading. Have a blessed day!! (:

  31. Geoff says:

    Esther said, “Young living saved me when conventional doctors said I was in the “normal range” of EVERYTHING!!!”

    Are you saying that board certified and trained physicians suggested you were healthy, and the young living made you not healthy? This is a very confusing statement, because it sounds like you weren’t sick, but then Young Living came along and made you not in the “normal range” anymore?

    Esther said, “I was led to a better doctor as well and now am on the road to healing and living better being more balanced and happy. I no longer depend on big pharmaceutical companies and all the side effects.”

    Does this doctor have a financial bias to push essential oils over scientifically and clinically tested medicines? Did this doctor suggest you were unhealthy when the previous doctor(s) suggested you were fine? Why were you depending on medicines if other doctors said you were fine? I’m sorry, but everything you are saying is extremely confusing.

    Esther said, “My husband was convinced they were snake oils too until he had a toothache one day. I put a drop of thieves oil on a Q-tip and it took the pain right away till we could get him to the dentist next day or when he stepped wrong and DoTerra’s deep blue made his hurt foot feel better than the non-hurt foot.”

    Esther, I found a couple of actual medical articles on the subject, and none have suggested that essential oils help with these particular issues. Also, from this article, http://childrensmd.org/uncategorized/return-essential-oils/ there was one section that really stuck out to me because they describe the placebo effect.

    “I can jabber on about PubMed research and most people don’t care– they’d rather try some essential oil themselves. If it works, who cares about the research? Here’s the problem with that approach: once you spend $79 on a tiny vial of Frankincense, you’re going to be looking for it to work. You’ll note every little improvement in your condition and attribute it to your lovely smelling treatment. But could you have achieved the same outcome with a hot bath, massage, and scented candle?”

    Take a moment and think about that…did you try other things that weren’t drugs or essential oils?

    Esther said, “Be careful using other oils as I have tried them too and they aren’t recommended for topical or internal use. YL’s peppermint clears my sinuses and helps with my headaches daily!! No need for advil or tylenol.”

    I’m not sure how much Tylenol or Advil you were taking, but they are actually FDA approved, and clinically tested. Acetaminophen is not harmful, and for you to suggest that essential oils work better is completely ridiculous.

  32. Esther says:

    Thank you for the attack!!(NOT) This was a mistake commenting on here. What kind of cruel hearts You have. I was just speaking from my own personal experience. I refuse to explain myself any further. Peace be with you. Feel free to read more about whatever YOU believe and I will cease to exist in your world.

  33. Geoff says:

    Esther said, “Thank you for the attack!!(NOT) This was a mistake commenting on here.”

    Where did I attack you? I asked very reasonable questions, and was very non confrontational. It was not a mistake for you to comment. It is important for people to give a different perspective, but you should also be open to other people’s views.

    Esther said, “What kind of cruel hearts You have.”

    You seem to be very emotional about absolutely nothing. I would suggest taking your emotional temperature before responding hastily and rereading the information that was being presented.

    Esther said, “I refuse to explain myself any further. Peace be with you. Feel free to read more about whatever YOU believe and I will cease to exist in your world.”

    You haven’t explained anything…and your post ignored any counterpoints that were given. I don’t just read articles that support my opinion, because that would not encompass the entire point. I don’t believe you were ever in my world to begin with, and your melodramatic response does not substantiate any of your previous beliefs.

  34. Holly says:

    I have enjoyed reading this article, along with the following discussion and opinion. I guess what it boils down to in my opinion is personal preference. I bought a starter kit from Young Living but I do not distribute and probably will not continue to belong to this MLM company. One of my oldest and dearest friends is a very successful distributor and swears by most of the products for her and her household. That is her choice and conviction.

    Personally, I am a single income household and simply don’t have the income to buy these products on a regular basis. Nor do I have the time to market and I am certainly not a sales person, so I have not made a single dime from this company. I have only contributed to others’ commission with my limited purchases.

    I can’t attest to any benefits or side effects from essential oils as I haven’t used any one oil consistently since getting the kit. I am sure there are probably benefits to them. I am also sure there are benefits as well and draw backs to modern medicine. I am exploring a more natural holistic approach to health, but I am taking it slow and doing research. That is my choice and preference, just as someone who fully relies on and trusts EOs or Pharmaceuticals.

    I appreciate this post, as it helped open my eyes and think again about multi-level marketing as a whole. I believe I will think twice before spending my money on products marketed and sold this way. It has me thinking and wanting to research alternative brands for myself. These companies will continue to come and go in the future, I am sure. To participate or not is up to each individual and how they choose to spend their hard earned money and conduct their lives. I am glad I stumbled upon your site today researching a totally different MLM company. Thank you for the information and for allowing people to comment, discuss and draw their own conclusion on these topics.

  35. Jerry K says:

    Thank you for this objective article. We purchase some DoTerra Essential Oils each month. But we are not on the Pyramid structure. My favorite is the Peppermint oil. One drop spread out on my face and neck and chest produces a warmth and uplifting aroma that lifts my spirits significantly! One drop! The Breathe lozenges and oil help clear the air passages quite well. The Deep Blue cream seems to sooth sore muscles and aches. It smells very similar to ointments and creams that I used on sore muscles when I was a college athlete. I am a retired scientist.

  36. Lazy Man says:

    Jerry K, I’ve found the same thing can happen from one drop of the Now version I have for around 1/5th or 1/10th the price (whatever it was). There are any number of cheap, but great, practically-equivalent alternatives you can buy without the expense of the “structure” (as you put it).

  37. Judi says:

    LOL…come for the info and stay for the train wreck.

  38. Jan says:

    I am a new user/buyer of doTERRA. I probably would have to agree with the smell makes you feel better, but doesn’t cure or prevent disease. Well, isn’t that what you want, to feel better? The lavender relaxes my whole family with a couple of drops. Haven’t tried the difuser yet, but that’s next. The oil that I swear by the most is the Deep Blue. I am a cancer fighter and have a lot of nerve damage, especially in my lower back. This used every morning with the coconut oil relieves this and lasts longer than any of the products you buy in the drugstore. Since using Deep Blue, about 6 weeks, the once constant pain has been reduced to when I overdo, which is normal life.

  39. Kelly says:

    Fantastic article! Thanks!

  40. Lazy Man says:

    It sounds like you are essentially saying that the value is the same as a scented candle. I have the NOW lavender which I think is about 1/10th the price and it does the same thing.

    So I’m not sure why people would pay 10x more than they have to for smells. As you mentioned, curing or preventing diseases isn’t in play here, so let’s leave that out of the discussion to avoid confusing people. Thanks.

  41. Mick says:

    Sounds like you need to do some research and do an article on the dangers of scented candles.

  42. Lazy Man says:

    Thanks Mick… open fires always have a danger. I hope that’s obvious and not in need of an article.

    You might also get great scents from the “tree” in your car. If you believe these scents are dangerous, I suggest you report it to the FTC.

    I have essential oils, from NOW as I disclosed, and that’s an option as well.

    This article is not about aromatherapy… we can agree on that, right?

  43. Mick says:

    It’s not about an open flame. Have you ever heard of BSD (black soot deposition)? Ever seen black spot stains on ceilings, walls, furniture, etc? Well the EPA and ALA have determined breathing particulate matter 2.5 microns or smaller is very detrimental to human health. These particles are dangerous because they are inhaled deeply into the lungs, causing irritation and respiratory problems, and possible long term health issues.

  44. Sojourner says:

    LazyMan, you lie in your first paragraph so how can we trust anything else you may say?

    Never has DoTerra sold Lavender for your so-called researched price of $68.00.

  45. Lazy Man says:

    Sojourner, if you follow the link to Amazon you’ll see that one bottle (15ml) is $23.10 and two bottles (each 15ml) are $46.20. The total of the three bottles is 45ml as I state, for a combined cost of $69.30. That is ~$68 noting that “~” means around.

    I didn’t say that DoTerra was selling these, just that one can buy the products for around that pricing on Amazon.

    If you lie about my lying, how can we trust anything you might say?

  46. Lesley says:

    I am a Wellness Advocate with doTERRA but I do not do it to make money. I started using them on myself for minor things like skin care, my hair, diffusing at home in 2009. I saw countless Advocates selling these oils online and not having a single clue about what they do and how dangerous they can be, it was all about reaching Diamond or Presidential level. I could easily have done that myself but I didn’t and haven’t. In 7 years, I have no one working below me – it’s just me. I’ve taken aromatherapy courses and am on my way to being certified. The things I have learned along the way make me cringe when I see uneducated Advocates on FB and blog sites “selling” this stuff and trying to recruit other uneducated Advocates. I have friends that buy from me, if they want. I don’t push it. I make recommendations if they ask. And they buy from me at my price and I keep the points for products later. That’s all I get out of it and I’m happy with that. Nine years I’ve been doing that! In the meantime, I’ve had 2 children and I have to say that I have used the oils on the girls for minor colds and aches and I am happy to say that they have helped their ailments. Now when my girls have a cut or a tummy bug or a bug bite or a bruise/scrape, they ask for the oils. I’m happy with that too! I just WISH that all these Advocates are educated and well informed about the oils, their uses, their components, what they can counteract with, etc.

  47. Lazy Man says:

    Lesley, maybe you can tell me why you pay as much as 10x more for oils when you don’t need to.

    How do you justify asking people to pay your price of 10x more when they can save so much money with the functional equivalent from other non-MLM companies?

  48. Lesley says:

    Lazy Man – they can buy whatever oils they want. I don’t push doTERRA on them. They ask me for advice on what oil might help and I give them the ones I know. I tell them they don’t have to buy them from me, they can do their research and buy from wherever. I told you – I am NOT in this to make money. In 7 years, I have NO ONE working under me. It’s me, myself and I. Granted, I am helping someone above me make money. And I choose to pay what I do for the oils because I like them, I have done the research and I appreciate the support I get from the company in terms of education.

  49. Lazy Man says:

    Of course anyone can buy whatever they want. I’m not sure anyone forces anyone to do anything.

    It just feels very odd. It’s like spending $250,000 for a Toyota Camary instead of $25,000 for a Honda Accord and justifying it as, “Well Toyota told me how to obey basic traffic laws.”

    I understand that you aren’t in this to make money. Why not do people a huge favor and save them from paying 10x as much? I can’t think of a single reason why someone would do that unless they hate people… and I don’t think you hate people.

  50. Mikey says:

    Your logic simply on the trademark issue is flawed. A business such as doTerra created a trademark in order to raise the bar on the quality of an essential oil. You have failed to do real research into doTerra, because these essential oils are made to be consumed, not just diffused. Therefore, they become more expensive by the need to put relentless effort into having the necessary concentration. They aren’t cheap, because other companies use synthetic chemicals to make their products cheaper. Therefore, they can only be diffused rather than consumed. Consumption and topical application of any plant would be the most effective, would it not? Then, why do essential oils differ from plants? Oil is the “personality” of a plant. It is what can have a positive or negative effect on a plant. I am shocked at the ignorance and shallow nature of this article. Poison ivy is harmful, why? The “greasy” nature of the oil on the plant causes a harmful reaction with the skin. It is the OIL that hurts people! Therefore, oils from other plants can have a positive effect. It isn’t supposed to substitute modern medicine; that would be absurd. You are right to say that anyone selling the product shouldn’t say that is does substitute. It is to help where medicine can’t help. You even mentioned mental illness. Modern medicine made my brother’s mental condition worse. It deteriorated his mind. So it right to assume that all medicines work? No. Pharmaceuticals obviously have side effects. If you know about chemistry, then you would understand such a concept. Side effects come from the side chains of a molecule that can negatively effect the body. Just like any oil from a plant can be positive or negative to the body. It is right to experiment with good quality while paying more, because I’d rather pay more then have serious problems with synthetic chemicals. Money becomes a trade off for the ability to use the essential oils in the most productive way, rather than just the smell as you mentioned. Please don’t fuel the fire of other’s confirmatory thinking. Do your research properly.

  51. Lazy Man says:

    Thank you for your opinion, Mikey.

    It would be easy for me dismiss it on the basis that people who don’t understand how paragraphs work might not be in the best position to lecture about trademarks.

    Companies do not create trademarks to raise the quality of an industry. Trademark, by definition on my quick Google search, is “a symbol, word, or words legally registered or established by use as representing a company or product.” Thus it is only about doTerra. That’s not a bad thing… The Patriots trademarked Do Your Job, not for awareness of football, but to protect the brand.

    If you want to raise the bar on the quality of a product or service, you do so by working with others in the same industry and funding a quality control of that. One good example is the National Dairy Council. You don’t just put together a phrase/slogan that sounds authortative and say, “Hey, this will improve the quality of all essential oils!”

    Mikey wrote, “You have failed to do real research into doTerra, because these essential oils are made to be consumed, not just diffused. Therefore, they become more expensive by the need to put relentless effort into having the necessary concentration.”

    Can you tell me the benefits of consuming essential oils? As I mentioned in the article, I bought 10 of them. I don’t see an FDA-approved medical reason to consume any of them.

    Mikey wrote, “They aren’t cheap, because other companies use synthetic chemicals to make their products cheaper. Therefore, they can only be diffused rather than consumed. Consumption and topical application of any plant would be the most effective, would it not? Then, why do essential oils differ from plants? Oil is the ‘personality’ of a plant.”

    Whoa… I’m going to go John Oliver on you. Other than Seymour in Little Shop of Horrors, plants don’t have personalities. And if they did, I don’t think they’d appreciate attributing it to “oil.” Would you like your personality attributed to oil? Maybe Life cereal could make a comeback if it was 50% canola oil… Mikey likes it!

    I might agree that consumption or topical application of a plant might be most effective. We aren’t talking hemlock or poison ivy, right?!?!

    Oh wait we are!

    Mikey wrote, “Poison ivy is harmful, why? The ‘greasy’ nature of the oil on the plant causes a harmful reaction with the skin. It is the OIL that hurts people! Therefore, oils from other plants can have a positive effect.”

    I’m going to suggest that your conclusion is ABSURD. What if we think of that reaction as a defense mechanism. If a bee stings me and it hurts, does it mean that wasps stinging is healthy? Of course not.

    Perhaps, we determine healthy things by science and the scientific method… not analogies that don’t hold water.

    Mikey wrote, “It isn’t supposed to substitute modern medicine; that would be absurd. You even mentioned mental illness. Modern medicine made my brother’s mental condition worse. It deteriorated his mind. ”

    I humbly suggest that it would be less absurd than what you’ve suggested above… and that’s saying something, because I used ALL CAPS on that.

    Mikey wrote, “It is to help where medicine can’t help.”

    That seems to be an endorsement that essential oils CAN HELP. Is that fair? Maybe you should watch this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhGuXCuDb1U

    If that’s what you are suggesting, I think we’re back to discussing the concept of “therapeutical” and “certified pure” with the FDA as it relates to mental illness.

    Mikey wrote, “It is right to experiment with good quality while paying more, because I’d rather pay more then have serious problems with synthetic chemicals.”

    I think that to make this claim, you need to prove that other products are synthetic and that synthetic have problems. The products from NOW as I bought are not, in any way that I know synthetic and of lesser quality.

    Please don’t push brands and FUD (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear,_uncertainty_and_doubt) here.

    Mikey wrote, “Money becomes a trade off for the ability to use the essential oils in the most productive way, rather than just the smell as you mentioned.”

    Anyone can use essential oils however they want to. I can’t prevent that. I just want to tell people that the only productive way seems to be smell according to my research. If you have another FDA approved use for essential oils for medical conditions (mental health or otherwise), please submit it!

  52. Vogel says:

    Mikey said: “doTerra…they become more expensive by the need to put relentless effort into having the necessary concentration.”

    ROFL! Who do you think you’re talking to here, junior? The reason their products are so stupidly expensive is simply because of the nature of the MLM payout structure; i.e., with half to two-thirds of revenue going toward payouts to the pyramid scheme participants (and obscene profits for the ringleaders).

    Mikey said: “Modern medicine made my brother’s mental condition worse.”

    And apparently it hasn’t helped yours much either.

    Mikey said: “Side effects come from the side chains of a molecule that can negatively effect the body.”

    Haha. Nothing like listening to an MLM baboon pretending to know biochemistry! Really, just too damn funny!

  53. thea says:

    Ok article and entertaining comments that I wasted way too much time reading instead of exercising. To any reader who is reading this: I guide you to Michael’s comment made in May 2016 as one that would be helpful to read. He allegedly is a real doctor who has several cases of folks who have been dangerously close to injured or dead because of relying on doTERRA oils. The only person I know who does doTERRA is a friend of a friend, who is actually really successful (I think Blue Diamond level, from what I can tell on facebook) and she does this full time. She does however pawn her goods at everything I see her at (weddings, baby showers, etc.) which gets to be odd at best. I thought I’d also chime in as even though she’s fairly high up, she CERTAINLY claims that oils cure everything from the common cold to mental illness (she herself is bipolar, I think stopped taking meds in favor of oils, and appears to have had a few episodes based on some disturbing posts on facebook. I believe she’s gone back on meds). I just thought I’d share my perspective from a sample size of 1.

  54. Thea says:

    Also, this was a fun article.
    http://www.utahstories.com/2014/08/damning-evidence-that-young-living-and-doterras-essential-oils-are-adulterated/

    Apparently doTerra was started from Young Living’s former employees, and so Young Living sued doTerra for copying their production process. An unintended consequence was that it became public that neither Young Living nor doTerra’s oils are “pure” like they claim and in fact have synthetic elements to them.

  55. Thea says:

    And it’s probably the nature of the MLM being kind of like a religion, but I’m going to go out on a limb and say that denigrating folks re: pretty base things like spelling and grammar probably isn’t the best way to convince someone that your side is right. I mean, maybe no one’s mind is changing anyhow, but I guess it provides some entertaining, if not somewhat mean, fodder to read.

  56. Sutsop says:

    Late to the party here, but I just wanted to reply to the comment that someone made about Young Living’s Theives Oil helping a toothache. A quick look at YL’s website shows the first ingredient is clove oil. The same thing my dentist recommended after I had my wisdom teeth taken out and got dry socket (ugh), and my dad’s dentist recommended when he had a toothache.

    Point being, you don’t need YL’s overpriced snake oil… You need a little bottle of clove oil, which you can pick up cheaply from CVS, etc.

    You are absolutely, positively paying for the “brand” when you buy from any of these MLM s. You’re not paying for scientific research, you’re paying for marketing research.

    I purchase oils fairly regularly, as perfumery is a hobby of mine. I purchase from suppliers that often deal directly with producers, have independent analysis done on their oils, and post this information freely. Their prices are nowhere near as inflated as these MLMs.

  57. Lazy Man says:

    Can I ‘steal’ this? Great explanation (in my opinion)!

    “You are absolutely, positively paying for the ‘brand’ when you buy from any of these MLMs. You’re not paying for scientific research, you’re paying for marketing research.”

  58. Kristin says:

    My favorite part in reading these comments are all the people with different names who respond by breaking down others people’s messages in the exact same way. Hmm… Maybe the same person? Also, Lazy Man, almost every time you comment you mention NOW oils but seem to be talking about the uselessness of using essential oils at all. If you’re really in it for just the scent, you can get a candle at your closest grocery store for $5 or less. Poor execution on your end, buddy. And as a side note, I think it’s extremely rude to comment so nastily on someone’s spelling and grammar. You have no idea who that person is or what they’re like. Just because they don’t have the correct grammar or spell correctly DOES NOT make them incompetent. Let’s be adults and be able to state our opinion without making other people out to be idiots because they don’t share it.

  59. Geoff says:

    Kristin,

    Did you actually have anything of value to add to the conversation, or were you going to be hypocritical and nitpick the style in which LM responds instead of his content?

    For the record, and I am not speaking on LM’s behalf (as you insinuated multiple people are responding in the same form to prior comments), I believe LM has shown an unbelievable amount of patience for ignorance. He has responded to people who have said the same things now for years and continues to post everyone’s comments. He has also engaged people constructively, even when they have gone off on emotional tirades or steered the conversation away from the subject matter (Ring any bells Kristin?). LM’s blog has generated more positive and constructive conversations about MLM than any other I have read, and is an unbelievably powerful resource for people who have questions.

    It may be time to look in the mirror Kristin.

  60. Lazy Man says:

    As best I can tell the people with different names are different people. They use different email addresses, different IPs, and things of that nature. Maybe people respond to the comments in the same way because comments in MLM articles are repetitive.

    I mention NOW oils because I actually bought them and they are a great value in comparison to DoTERRA’s pricing. When I originally wrote the article, I didn’t have any experience with essential oils, so maybe that’s why you see a change. You shouldn’t view the article and comments as something that happened in one day, but something that has evolved over time.

    I do, and I think I always have, recognized the value of aromatherapy. If you read my comments, you’ll even see that I mentioned scented candles as well. Without doing a rigorous financial analysis, a few drops of the $5 essential oils I bought in a diffuser lasts a long time, similar to a scented candle. I’ve got no problems if people decide to save money with scented candles.

    I openly make fun of myself for my grammar. Despite having a linguistics degree, I often make grammar mistakes. My brain often thinks faster than my fingers type and I leave out valuable words like verbs in sentences. Sometimes, I go back and edit words and the rest of the sentence doesn’t agree with the change. I rarely comment on other people’s grammar, but in extreme cases, I can’t help but point it out. If people don’t understand paragraphs and have around a dozen spelling errors in a 75 word comment, I have to point it out.

    I think such extreme cases are an indication of their education level, which I believe explains why they might spend 10x more on a different brand of a “pure” product.

    So Kristin, do you actually have a useful thing to add to the discussion itself, or do you just like to give comments on the comments?

  61. Sutsop says:

    Kristin, I can assure you that I am no one but little ol’ me commenting here. I have no intention of “breaking” anyone down. My comment was intended to encourage people not to buy into any company’s hype, and to do their own research. There are some great little suppliers out there, selling wonderful, high quality products. They don’t have marketing teams or sales pitches. They do have honest, upfront information about their product and its origins. They do publicly post Certificates of Analysis on their products, so you know precisely what you’re buying, rather than vague statements about “purity”. And yet, their prices are still very reasonable.
    If saying that makes me a big ol’ internet meanie, so be it. At least I’m not a sucker.

  62. Dee says:

    FYI – this appeared on my FB feed yesterday from a seller: “No scientist researched this blend…it was created by a fellow cross-line doTERRA Wellness Advocate who knows there are ALOT of people who would also feel this way some days (who can relate??)
    Now, next week at convention I’ll learn from Johns Hopkins about their research on all of our oils and blends!
    Yes, Johns Hopkins is researching all of d?TERRA’s oils and blends…they won’t work with any other essential oil company! If you don’t know, d?TERRA is a science and research company working with the best in research!”

  63. Lazy Man says:

    That reminds me of Nerium throwing around the Princeton name. Don’t get caught up in a confidence game.

  64. Jennifer Cassie says:

    Lazy man- You are a very ignorant individual. Does it help you sleep better at night making fun of people and how they spell. You are a very ignorant idividual who’s opinion is wrong and you talk about others not being educated I think that you should be ashamed of yourself treating others that way. People do not always have the same opinion as you but to make fun of them is uncalled for. You are a pompous ***. If anyone has any real questions about essential oils and does not want to listen to this tart anymore please email me and I would love to help you. [Editor’s note: Email removed. Please don’t include contact information in comments]. You have shown no actual facts and if you would like to kill all of your organs using medication you go for it. If you are going to knock a company Atleast have all the proper facts.

  65. Lazy Man says:

    Maybe I have to look back, but I don’t recall making fun of anyone’s spelling in some time. Maybe several months I did in an extreme case. I did make fun of someone’s lack of using paragraphs, because 1) it was hard to read and 2) he seemed to be lecturing me on trademarks (of which he appears to be wrong about).

    The rest of your comment Cassie is much worse name calling than I ever did, which comes across as hypocritical.

    What does “killing all of your organs using medication” have ANYTHING to do with this discussion of essential oils? Please stick to the topic of essential oils and not medicine which helps heal people from sicknesses and other maladies.

    Thanks

  66. JJdan says:

    Thanks for this article- it is information that is helpful to me. I have a friend at the convention now who is so hook line and sinker into Doterra. She tells me there are doctors from Johns Hopkins there who have done trials (of course Doctors are compromised- who funded the trials is what I want to ask) It worries me for her sake as she is a good smart person who just wants to believe and on the whole, essential oils are helpful and from nature but for me it is Doterra and the culture it promotes and the moneymaking aspects of it that say “danger, danger will robinson.” . I suppose the nature of the MLM or pyramid schemes has rung “false” to me. Your article informs us about this a bit more and then we can all judge for ourselves based on the facts. But that said, my friend is a generous, believer type and I am a generous, doubter type- we are different and there are pros and cons to our respective personality types. She is a wonderful person and I do not want want to see her going down a rabbit hole and her desire to find work and help people is a genuine one.

    My sentiments are along the lines of Thea (comment 53-55) as well I should add that Lazyman as much as I appreciate and find humor in your comments, they do sting and can be hurtful and so respectfully ask that we try to be a bit kinder so as not to take away from the legitimacy of what you are saying. We can all read that the person with the spelling and grammatical errors- well there is something really sad about everything she is saying and the form in which she is conveying her thoughts… that speaks for itself. So I’m not adding much except for my thanks for the article and my hope that we can exchange information while being decent to one another.

  67. JJdan says:

    PS, I realize that i should have checked my comments. I’m missing a lot f commas and haven’t capitazlied or ( e.g. hook, line, and sinker; good, smart person; Will Robinson) the auto correct capitalized things- the quickness of pressing that “send” or “post” button!

  68. Kathy says:

    Funny story. Just now a DoTERRA rep left my house after a wonderful presentation. She is a true believer and just returned home from a convention.
    I’m a skeptic by nature, almost to a fault but also curious. I revealed that to her upon our meeting. I do think that oils have a lot of benefits and they smell wonderful. I guess my skepticism lies in spending $275 in a start up kit ( that’s the medium price) and being charged $35 a month to be a part of this elite group. Honestly, I was on board until she broke out with the order form.
    Towards the end of the presentation I googled DoTerra and came across your website. Thank you. Very informative. You confirmed what I suspected. If I do decide to order essensual oils I will go with Now.

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