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Is Yevo a Scam?

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Update: Yevo changed it's compensation structure awhile ago which made it appear to be less like an MLM or a pyramid scheme. In a post on July 27, 2016, BehindMLM reveals that Yevo will shut down due to a "lack of success". In my opinion, Yevo wasn't viable without the MLM/pyramid scheme component. I don't think people were interested in paying that $5.00 serving price for oatmeal.

Back in October, 2014 I wrote an article: How To Start a $500 Million Company the Easy Way. It was meant to be satire of the MLM/Pyramid schemes out there. I outlined how they worked and how you could pull off the same scam with misinformation.

So imagine my surprise when a friend wrote me the very next day saying, (paraphrased) "Did you see that Paul Myhill is starting a new MLM company?"

It turns out that this company is Yevo.

A Little Background on Paul Myhill and MLM

Previously readers could read more about Paul Myhill and LifeVantage, but this happened. Fortunately, he's not very important in the Yevo story.

Enough of Paul Myhill, let's talk Yevo

Yevo looks to be an attempt to bring a bunch of people who left LifeVantage back together. Yes, the people who pushed drinks through an MLM company called Zrii went an MLM, LifeVantage to sell pills, and have now moved on to a new MLM company, Yevo.

In my experience, this is what happens when the growth of recruiting new people into the pyramid stalls at one company. It really isn't logically that the same group of people would go from one to another.

So let's cover a few of these people. Unfortunately, because many of the top people at Yevo is

  • Peter Castleman, Founder and Chairman of the Board - His claim to fame is being involved with Herbalife. Yes, the same Herbalife that is being investigated by every regulatory agency you can think of for being a pyramid scheme... FTC, SEC, DoJ, and FBI, check, check, check, check.

    I guess they were unable to get someone from Enron or Madoff's schemes?

    Quite literally almost any other human on Earth would be a better choice. In fact, they'd have more credibility in my eyes if they named Curious George as Founder. As far as I can tell, he hasn't been involved with anything even questionably a pyramid scheme. Maybe he turned down the job ;-).

  • David Brown, CEO, Kirby Zenger, Chief Architect Officer, Gene Tipps, COO - They are all formerly from LifeVantage.
  • Ben Seeman – Chief Sales Officer - Prior to LifeVantage he was associated with the pyramid company Metabolife with David Brown above. Here's what Wikipedia says with citations about Metabolife:

    Metabolife International, Inc., was a multi-level marketing company based in San Diego, California which manufactured dietary supplements. Metabolife's best-selling product, an ephedra-based supplement called Metabolife 356, once generated hundreds of millions of dollars in annual sales.[1] However, Metabolife 356 and other ephedra-containing supplements were linked to thousands of serious adverse events, including deaths, which caused the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban the sale of ephedra-containing dietary supplements in 2004.

    Subsequently, Metabolife's founder was convicted of lying to the FDA and concealing evidence of ephedra's dangers, and the company and its owner were both convicted of income tax evasion. A congressional investigation found that Metabolife had received thousands of reports of serious adverse events, many occurring in young and otherwise healthy people, and that Metabolife concealed the reports and acted with "indifference to the health of consumers."

    So Yevo's management company has ties back to Herbalife and the stunningly illegal acts of harming consumers of Metabolife.

  • Jason Domingo, Master Distributor - The term "master distributor" is given to someone at the top of the pyramid. This person gets partial credit for the sales of every other salesperson. If you were to describe a pyramid scheme a master distributor would be the guy at the top.

But What About Yevo's Products?

One of their first products is oatmeal. It comes in at a wholesale price of $5.00 per serving.

A friend sent me this video showing just how ridiculous it is.

It's true, you can buy the premium Nature's Path Organic Oatmeal for around 50 cents a serving on Amazon.com (it's even cheaper if you Subscribe and Save.)

So why pay ten times more than you have to?

Perhaps one of the reasons is that there's deceptive marketing involved. For example, there are a number of results on Google pointing to marketers claiming: "But our oatmeal has 26 grams of protein (equivalent to a 16 ounce Rib-eye)."

Yet according to SparkPeople (and any other legitimate nutrition website) a 16-ounce Rib-eye has 79 grams of protein.

In this case, it isn't just deceptive, it's straight-out fraud.

And let's not get into how it is easy it is to create processed foods with high protein... simply look at any protein bar. And let's not get into how cheap rice protein is.

And then there's the marketing of Yevo being part of the "trillion dollar food industry." That's the equivalent of putting on my son's college application that his lemonade stand was part of the "trillion dollar beverage industry." How much weight do you think that would have with admissions?

As my friend wrote me, "No legitimate business person would ever make such a ridiculous marketing claim. However, if your intention is to deceive people about a business opportunity it makes sense."

Is Yevo a Pyramid Scheme?

There's a great video about pyramid schemes from billionaire Bill Ackman's company, Pershing Square:

When I watch that video, I see a lot of similarities with Yevo. However, let's dig a little deeper:

Reviewing Yevo through the FTC Guidelines

For this section I'll quote from the Federal Trade Commission's advice on MLMs/pyramid schemes

"Not all multilevel marketing plans are legitimate. If the money you make is based on your sales to the public, it may be a legitimate multilevel marketing plan. If the money you make is based on the number of people you recruit and your sales to them, it’s not. It’s a pyramid scheme. Pyramid schemes are illegal, and the vast majority of participants lose money."

If you looking into run a legitimate business, you MUST ensure that you can sell a lot of the above product over your own wholesale cost to balance the amount of money that is made by recruiting. Thus far, all the marketing I've seen for Yevo by Yevo distributors has been around recruitment. In fact, they started recruited people before they even announced products.

Red flags do not get any more red than that.

"Many companies that market their products through distributors sell quality items at competitive prices. But some offer goods that are overpriced, have questionable merits, or are downright unsafe to use. Find out what will you be selling. Are similar products on the market? Is the product priced competitively?"

Well, clearly the products aren't priced competitively.

The reason why this is important is because pyramid schemes use the lure of the business opportunity of recruiting others to get people buy their overpriced product that they normally wouldn't if it was sold in their grocery store. In this case, it looks like Yevo makes at least $4.00 per serving than it would otherwise. Most of the money it pays to distributors goes to the top 1%.

The people at the bottom end could end up paying $1825 per year for oatmeal that would ordinarily cost them around $180 (using our example above). The end result is that the consumer at the bottom loses $1645 per year.

That's a lot of money that could be spent on better health choices or even giving to charity to help others.

"Many of these "quick cures" are unproven, fraudulently marketed, and useless."

The video covering the oatmeal that I linked to above covered one such deceptive practice. The marketing of the amount of protein compared to a rib-eye is another.

"Find — and study — the company’s track record.... Find out: how long the company has been in business"

Well Yevo has a soft launch in a few days, so there's no company track record to speak of.

I've covered the individuals leading the company above and clearly their track record is horrendous.

Conclusion: I could probably go through the FTC document in more detail, but even before this company officially launched it's managed to hit many of the FTC's red flags.

Summing It All Up

Given the above information, I don't how anyone can claim that Yevo is NOT a scam. Any one area should be enough of a red flag, but when there is evidence after evidence, the conclusion becomes clear to me.

Last updated on August 2, 2016.

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381 Responses to “Is Yevo a Scam?”

  1. Vogel says:

    Just did a quick value comparison on Yevo’s EN-43 Frijoles (refried red beans). They retail at $80 for 15 servings (79 g per serving), which works out to 1185 g total and a cost of $6.75 per 100 g ($5.06 wholesale).
    https://jodiunruh.myyevo.com/shop/product/4015US

    I found a perfectly suitable comparison product: Santa Fe Bean Co.’s Instant Fat Free Black Refried Beans. They sell 58 oz (1644.3 g) for $19.04, which works out to $1.16 per 100 g.
    http://www.amazon.com/Santa-Fe-Bean-Instant-7-25-Ounce/dp/B000FIAWVE

    Unlike Yevo’s beans, the Santa Fe beans are fat-free and sugar-free, and they don’t contain crap additives like palm oil and soy protein, or cheap fillers like potassium (almost 2 g in Yevo), etc.
    http://www.santafebean.com/Santa_Fe_Bean_Company/Nutrition.html https://s3.amazonaws.com/yevo43/EN43+Frijoles-NFP.png

    And to make matters worse, the company’s execs tell inexplicable falsehoods about the product, like in this video at the 00:58 mark where Stacey Bells tries to differentiate Yevo’s frijoles from other brands, claiming “we don’t add any stuff to ours”, even though the product label plainly shows that they add a ridiculous amount of “stuff” to their frijoles, like vitamins, exogenous protein and fiber, minerals, oils, spices, etc.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkdlkeLeRHU

    So in a nutshell, this is another great example of why Yevo sucks. Their frijoles are a grossly overpriced inferior quality product, and to compensate for the poor value, the company disseminates blatantly false information by saying that the frijoles contain no “added stuff” (and probably that they cure Alzheimer’s and hemorrhoids too, as has been implied with their other products).

  2. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “Most people who make Yevo part of their diet aren’t going to comparing (sic) it against a meal at a restaurant.”

    Vogel said: “Um, BS! That’s in fact exactly what the company’s marketing materials and distributors do (e.g. comparing Yevo to McDonalds). Certainly you know that already, which proves once again that you are a barefaced liar.”
    https://www.yevo43.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Oats-No-Sugar-Compare-Chart-20151103.pdf http://www.brianbrinker.com/blog/yevo-vs-mcdonalds https://www.facebook.com/holistic43/posts/1033509963339068

    Susan (in objection to my comment above) said: “I wouldn’t call McDonald’s “Diner” food, which is what Lazyman was originally referring to. McDonald’s is processed crap this will surely kill you if you make a regular diet of it: Baldface liar is pretty extreme, don’t ya think?

    No not extreme at all considering some of the other words that are floating around in my head that would describe you a T; and most of all, not in light of the fact that you said something blatantly stupidly wrong and then instead of owning it, you tried to exonerate yourself by changing the subject to the perils of McDs food and some off-topic nitpick about “diners”, which never even came up once in either of our comments.

  3. Vogel says:

    Let’s talk mashed potatoes. Another Yevo product, another epic failure. For comparison with Yevo’s EN-43 instant mashed potatoes, I did a quick Google search and picked out 6 retail brands of instant mashed potatoes, ranging from well-known supermarket brands to a premium health-food store organic brand. The price comparison below lists the brand name, unit retail price, unit quantity in grams, calculated price per 100 g, and URL for the 6 retail products and Yevo, ranked in increasing order of cost.

    Simplot True Recipe: $6.49 (2000 g) — $0.32 per 100 g
    http://www.webstaurantstore.com/instant-mashed-potatoes-10-can/99900582.html

    Idaho Spuds Classic: $2.78 (756 g) — $0.37 per 100 g
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Idaho-Spuds-Classic-Mashed-Potatoes-26.7-oz/21476101

    Hungry Jack: $2.98 (756 g) — $0.39 per 100 g
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Hungry-Jack-Naturally-Flavored-Mashed-Potatoes-26.7-oz/21467379

    Emergency Essentials: $13.00 (1670 g) — $0.78 per 100 g
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Emergency-Essentials-Instant-Mashed-Potatoes-59-oz/47157532

    Augason Farms: $11.96 (1360 g) — $0.88 per 100 g
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Augason-Farms-Emergency-Food-Potato-Gems-Complete-Mashed-Potatoes-48-oz/21777155

    Edward & Sons Organic: $2.59 (100 g) — $2.59 per 100 g
    http://www.iherb.com/Edward-Sons-Organic-Mashed-Potatoes-Home-Style-3-5-oz-100-g/32732

    Yevo (distributor price): $65.00 (1290 g) — $5.04 per 100 g
    Yevo (retail price): $86.67 (1290 g) — $6.72 per 100 g
    https://jodiunruh.myyevo.com/shop/product/4025US

    Yevo retails at 21.7 times the cost of the lowest-priced brand, 2.6 times the cost of the highest-priced brand (a premium organic product), and 7.6 times the average retail price of the non-MLM brands (89 cents per 100 g). I don’t give much consideration to Yevo’s distributor price because it requires monthly auto-ship and the average consumer doesn’t go through 15 servings of mashed potatoes every month; but even with the discount (a mere 25%), Yevo still stacks up horribly (15.5 times, 1.9 times, and 5.7 times, respectively). Over the course of a year on autoship, one would spend a gob-smacking $780+ whereas the equivalent amount of Hungry Jack would cost a measly $36.

    Since the focus of this site is personal finance, it cannot be emphasized enough how bad an idea it is to waste $744 a year for some pyramid scheme’s crappy powdered mashed potatoes.

  4. Vogel says:

    Now with the cost comparisons of non-MLM products versus Yevo’s mashed potato powder, frijoles, not-a-smoothies, and oatmeal out of the way, the next product to consider is their newly launched granola. Once again, as expected, Yevo fails in horrific fashion.

    I began again with a quick Google search and picked out 5 retail (non-MLM) brands of granola, ranging from well-known supermarket brands like Quaker to premium health-food store brands like Bob’s Red Mill and two organic brands (Love Crunch and Cascadian). The price comparison below lists the brand name, unit retail price, unit quantity in grams, calculated price per 100 g, and URL for the 5 retail products and Yevo, ranked in increasing order of cost.

    Quaker w/ raisins: $4.50 (793 g) = $0.57 per 100 g
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Quaker-100-Natural-Granola-with-Raisins/13399215

    Love Crunch Organic Dark Chocolate and Red Berries: $32.17 (4020 g) = $0.80 per 100 g
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Nature-s-Path-Organic-Love-Crunch-Dark-Chocolate-Red-Berries-Premium-Granola-11.5-oz-Pack-of-6/29473258

    Cascadian Farm Organic Fruit & Nut: $3.28 (325 g) = $1.01 per 100 g
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Cascadian-Farm-Organic-Fruit-And-Nut-Organic-Granola-13.5-oz/10813984

    Bear Naked Fruit and Nut: $3.65 (340 g) = $1.07 per 100 g
    https://jet.com/product/Bear-Naked-Fruit-and-Nutty-Granola-12-Ounce/eeee0f09cb7a485eb616716fe2a53822

    Bob’s Red Mill No Fat: $3.79 (340 g) = $1.11 per 100 g
    https://jet.com/product/Bobs-Red-Mill-Granola-Natural-No-Fat-12-Ounce/a097135e47f5430087bf6ececc5fcceb

    Yevo (distributor price): $60 (1430 g) = $4.20 per 100 g
    Yevo (retail): $75 (1430 g) = $5.24 per 100 g
    https://yevo43.myyevo.com/shop/product/4003US

    Yevo retails at 9.2 times the cost of the lowest-priced brand (Quaker), 4.7 times the cost of the second highest-priced brand (Bob’s Red Mill Fat Free), and 5.7 times the average retail price of the non-MLM brands (91 cents per 100 g, ranging from $0.57 to $1.11). Even at the distributor price (a mere 25% discount), Yevo still stacks up horribly — 7.4 times, 3.8 times, and 4.6 times, respectively. Despite not being organic, Yevo retails at 5.2 to 6.6 times the price of the two organic brands (Cascadian and Love Crunch).

    Over the course of a year on autoship (distributor price), one would spend an outrageous $720+ for Yevo, whereas the equivalent amount of Quaker granola would cost a measly $97 (saving at least $623 annually); and Bob’s Red Mill, the highest priced non-MLM brand, would cost only $189 (saving $530 annually).

    Of the most glaringly evident shortcomings revealed by the Yevo ingredient label is that, the number 1 ingredient in Yevo is soy flakes! The #1 ingredient in every other brand of granola is “whole grain rolled oats”. The #4 ingredient in Yevo is coconut oil and #5 is glycerin, and the product is also diluted with fairly large amounts of potassium, calcium, magnesium, and other additives.
    https://www.yevo43.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Yevo-EN43-Granola-Nutrition-Facts.pdf

    Second, while all of the non-MLM brands contain premium (i.e. costly) ingredients like fruit, nuts, berries, dark chocolate, vanilla, honey, maple syrup, etc., Yevo contains none. Thus, it can be concluded that Yevo’s is a vastly inferior product despite retailing for almost 6 times the average retail price for non-MLM granola brands.

    Relevant to taste, the sugar content of Yevo (1 g per serving) is by far the lowest of all the brands (average = 10 g; Quaker = 15 g, Cascadian = 14 g, Bob’s = 10 g, Bear Naked = 7 g, Love Crunch = 6 g). The label does not list any acesulfame potassium (ACE-K) or other artificial sweeteners. One would expect that with such a low sugar content and no other sweetener added, and in the absence of dried fruit (responsible in part for the higher sugar content of the other brands), Yevo would taste relatively awful, and particularly so as a result of its inclusion of soy flakes, minerals, amino acids, omega fatty acids, choline, and other additives, which probably constitute somewhere around 50% of the product by weight. Another way to look at it would be that each serving of Yevo provides about half as much actual granola as a non-MLM brand, with the rest consisting of cheap additives. Thus, the price differentials mentioned above would in effect be multiplied by two (and by two once more for Yevo’s lack of premium ingredients).

    Lastly, it seemed a bit odd that Yevo’s single-serving pouches list a serving size of 65 g while their bulk packages list a serving size of 55 g. Could be the earlier version was pulled or never launched, but who knows.
    https://www.yevo43.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Granola-info-sheet-8.5×11.pdf
    https://www.yevo43.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Yevo-EN43-Granola-Nutrition-Facts.pdf

  5. Susan says:

    Vogel said “Now with the cost comparisons of non-MLM products versus Yevo’s mashed potato powder, frijoles, not-a-smoothies, and oatmeal out of the way, the next product to consider is their newly launched granola. Once again, as expected, Yevo fails in horrific fashion.”

    You must watch the Yevo site pretty closely because this product was just released to the general public this week.

    For the past month or so it has been used in the Yevo diet study that has been ongoing and from what I understand it is wildly popular.

    Vogel “Second, while all of the non-MLM brands contain premium (i.e. costly) ingredients like fruit, nuts, berries, dark chocolate, vanilla, honey, maple syrup, etc., Yevo contains none. Thus, it can be concluded that Yevo’s is a vastly inferior product despite retailing for almost 6 times the average retail price for non-MLM granola brands”

    This is your opinion and is mostly baseless. Your top example, listed above, has sugar as it’s third highest ingredient and ranks at a hopping 33g of carbohydrate per serving. If one is looking for a quick energy fix, then this product is well suited for that purpose. For the average working person, eating very much of this product is just going to make you fat.

    The Yevo product, on the other hand, is designed to be healthy along with the other line-up of products.

  6. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “You must watch the Yevo site pretty closely because this product was just released to the general public this week.”

    Yawn. Another pointless comment. Was it not already totally obvious that I have been browsing Yevo’s product inventory over the past week gathering information for the comparisons I’ve been posting? Granola was simply one of the products on their list.

    Susan said: “For the past month or so it has been used in the Yevo diet study that has been ongoing and from what I understand it is wildly popular.”

    The product’s highly unappetizing ingredient list strongly suggests otherwise. But nonetheless, it is entertaining watching you resort to vague parroted rumors and foolishly thinking that they are more compelling than the product label.

    Vogel said: “Second, while all of the non-MLM brands contain premium (i.e. costly) ingredients like fruit, nuts, berries, dark chocolate, vanilla, honey, maple syrup, etc., Yevo contains none. Thus, it can be concluded that Yevo’s is a vastly inferior product despite retailing for almost 6 times the average retail price for non-MLM granola brands”

    Susan replied: “This is your opinion and is mostly baseless.”

    Um, no, it’s clearly not my “opinion”; it’s simple fact backed by plain evidence (i.e. the numerical comparisons that I presented to support my argument). There’s no ambiguity, unless you can’t understand math and are foolish enough to think that the soy flake concentrate that accounts for the bulk of Yevo’s granola is a premium ingredient while the dried fruit, nuts, vanilla, honey, etc. in the other brands (two of which were certified organic) are not.

    Susan said: “Your top example, listed above, has sugar as it’s third highest ingredient and ranks at a hopping 33g of carbohydrate per serving.”

    Unlike the soy-based sawdust that Yevo is passing off as granola, the other brands I listed are “real” granola. They consist of rolled oats as the first ingredient and they have dried fruit as well, and both inherently are sources of carbs – that’s the nature of granola. I already gave a detailed breakdown of the sugar content per serving of the different products in my previous comparison. They ranged from a low of 6 g for Love Crunch to a high of 16 g for Quaker (the example that you chose to focus on); the average of the 5 brands was 10 g per serving, which is not at all unreasonable given that they contain ingredients like dried fruit, honey, brown sugar, maple syrup, etc., which are necessary for flavor and are, in part, what people are buying granola for – something that tastes halfway palatable. And to put things in perspective, the average amount of sugar in a serving of those brands is less than half the amount in an 8-oz serving of Tropicana Pure premium OJ (22 mg).
    http://www.tropicana.com/#/trop_products/productsLanding.swf?TropicanaPurePremium/21

    It’s not an asset that Yevo only contains 1 g sugar per serving. It’s a guarantee that the product would be the worst tasting granola imaginable, especially considering that it consists of a cheap tasteless blend of mainly soy flake concentrate along with various mineral, amino acid, and vitamin additives; with no fruit, no nuts, no vanilla, and no inherent sweetness. It’s barely a notch better than fortified sawdust and yet it sells for 6 times the average price of real granola.

    When I look at the ingredient list of Yevo’s stupidly overpriced low-grade soy-granola, I can’t help but laugh at the mental image of their sucker distributors barely being able to choke it down and straining with all their might as they pretend to like it. Poor saps!

  7. Susan says:

    Vogel said “The product’s highly unappetizing ingredient list strongly suggests otherwise. But nonetheless, it is entertaining watching you resort to vague parroted rumors and foolishly thinking that they are more compelling than the product label.”

    Again, this is all speculation. You are assuming it tastes like crap, but you have no proof other than what you think a list of ingredients might taste like. You seem to do that alot here. Why don’t you ask someone for a sample and try it. My guess is like most everyone who tries it, you’ll like the taste of yet (however, I suspect you’d never admit that).

    To me, most granola tastes like I’m eating horse food or something. I actually hate most granola mixes. I happen to like how the Yevo granola tastes especially when you eat it with some almond milk like a cold cereal.

    Remember, the point of eating Yevo foods is to get your 43 essential nutrients and not to get a mouth full of sugar.

    Fruit juice is a horrible example Vogel. I would expect better than this from someone with your knowledge of nutrients. You might as well just be drinking a glass of sugar water.

  8. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “Again, this is all speculation. You are assuming it tastes like crap, but you have no proof other than what you think a list of ingredients might taste like. You seem to do that alot here. Why don’t you ask someone for a sample and try it. My guess is like most everyone who tries it, you’ll like the taste of yet (however, I suspect you’d never admit that).”

    Once again, I have presented facts which you disingenuously dismiss as “speculation” and in lieu of anecdotes. There are at least 4 separate lines of evidence that indicate that it tastes like crap:

    (1) Chip Marsland’s discussion of the products’ bad taste and smell (i.e., like fish), which he attributes to unintentional oxidation/rancidity of fats and proteins in the product as well as the inclusion of choline.

    03:49 – “Remember we don’t use and artificial flavors or preservatives…[04:00] Let’s face it guys, it’s a challenge for you guys too; we’re trying to put things together that no one else has ever done, and it’s not an easy thing…[04:32] The taste profile has changed. To me, I think it’s better…and I know that there’s people out there that don’t think the same as we do…[05:30] what happens to the reactions between minerals, fats and proteins…[05:46] we had minerals interacting with the proteins and the fats, and it creates a reaction that to me has a bad taste and smell…[08:58] To me, I know choline doesn’t smell good…we go out of our way even to protect you from the choline smell. We do a lot of things, people, that no one knows about, to our ingredients to make them more palatable…I know that over time those that may have differences of opinion will come over with us.”
    https://www.yevo43.com/episode-1-it-only-gets-better/

    (2) Chip Marlsland’s admission that the flavor is adversely affected because of the products inclusion of so many additives:

    28:08 – “The amount of nutrients that goes into our foods is so high, I mean, y’know, please deal with the flavor sometimes. We always try to make the best things that we can, but boy, I’ll tell you, try covering up all those minerals — that is really hard. Ha ha ha ha. It, it is a tough thing to do.”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uruK0OPPyPA

    (3) The admission of distributors that the product tastes/smells bad:

    Alex Severn: “When you smell the dry Yevo Smootie powder, it has a slight fishy smell to it so I suspect my suspicious is correct about the source of the Omega-3.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-2/#comment-1312119

    Yevo distributor Alix Martinez: “It smells gross, someone said fish food, I would say that’s accurate! The first three days I didn’t like the taste. I left my cup out for 24 hours and it got moldy. This is gross.”
    https://www.facebook.com/my43nutrients/photos/a.1634673106788544.1073741828.1602177613371427/1666436163612238

    “So I opened the bag and did what anyone else would do, I smelled it. I felt like I opened a bag of Fish Food. Ugh, how was I ever going to drink this. I was mad for not going to get the bananas. Reluctantly I moved forward. I put only Almond milk, Ice and the fish food in my blender.”
    https://www.facebook.com/my43nutrients/photos/a.1634673106788544.1073741828.1602177613371427/1664699673785887

    (4) Commonsense and rudimentary culinary knowledge. EN-43 “granola” (using the term loosely), unlike every brand of real granola on the market, consists of soy flake concentrate as the number 1 ingredient (as opposed to whole rolled oats); lacks ingredients present in all other brands of granola that confer good flavor: (e.g., dried fruit, nuts, vanilla); is almost completely lacking in sweeteners (1 g sugar only), either natural (such as brown sugar, honey, or maple syrup used in other brands) or artificial; and contains by weight about 50% additives (exogenous protein, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, etc.). With a recipe like that, how could it not taste bad? You may as well argue that just because a product’s ingredients consist of dog vomit and quinine (and is described by the manufacturer and its distributors as bad smelling/tasting), one can’t even begin to suggest that it would taste bad unless they were try it first. That’s idiotic. You know it tastes bad. And it serves you right that you have to shovel that shit down your gullet daily as punishment.

    Also, notice that I refer to Yevo’s EN43 facetiously as ”granola” because it doesn’t even meet the definition:

    “Granola: A breakfast food consisting of rolled oats, brown sugar, nuts, dried fruit, etc., usually served with milk.”
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/granola

    Yevo has oats, but lacks the other 3 hallmark ingredients. Oats alone are not synonymous with granola. Even more so, soy flake concentrate with some oats (i.e., Yevo’s product) is not synonymous with granola; in fact, I have no idea what in the culinary realm it would be synonymous with. Something akin to animal feed or a slightly less palatable version of what would be airdropped over Ethiopia during a famine perhaps.

    Now let’s close with a thought exercise. Here’s a “brownie” recipe ingredient list I came up with inspired by Yevo. Tell me whether you’d have to try the finished product to know that these brownies would taste terrible.

    1 cup soy flake concentrate
    1 cup flour
    1/2 cup salt
    1/2 cup baking powder
    1/2 cup corn starch
    1 Centrum (finely ground)
    1 dash fermented fish sauce

    Notice that, collectively, the ingredients in my recipe don’t even remotely constitute a brownie, since no nuts, cocoa, or sugar are included; much the same way Yevo’s product doesn’t resemble granola, since it doesn’t have dried fruit, nuts, or sweetness (the hallmarks of granola) and consists mainly of soy flake concentrate and vitamin/mineral powder (with the aroma/taste of fish).

  9. Vogel says:

    Susan said: ”To me, most granola tastes like I’m eating horse food or something. I actually hate most granola mixes. I happen to like how the Yevo granola tastes especially when you eat it with some almond milk like a cold cereal.”

    Then you’d probably also love the flavorless not-really-brownies in my example above. Maybe the brain damage that impairs your cognitive abilities and moral reasoning also extends to the centers controlling taste and smell. Or, more likely, you’re just lying, as you do so often, because it serves your selfish financial interest. That’s all the speculation that is necessary to explain why you would say something about the taste that flies in the face of evidence and commonsense.

    Susan said: “Remember, the point of eating Yevo foods is to get your 43 essential nutrients and not to get a mouth full of sugar.”

    Ohhh, I see. You mean like the 18-gram “mouthful” of sugar that Yevo puts in each serving of their apple and cinnamon oatmeal and rice gruel? That happens to be 2 g/serving more than even the most sugary granola brand (Quaker, 16 g/serving) among the 5 examples in my comparative analysis; 3 times the amount of sugar in the least sugary brand (Love Crunch, 6 g/serving); and 1.8 times the average of the 5 brands (10 g/serving).
    https://s3.amazonaws.com/yevo43/Apple-Cinn-Oats-EN43.pdf https://s3.amazonaws.com/yevo43/Rice-Cereal-EN43.pdf

    Susan said: “Fruit juice is a horrible example Vogel. I would expect better than this from someone with your knowledge of nutrients. You might as well just be drinking a glass of sugar water.”

    Are you playing dumb on purpose again? Fresh OJ (not from concentrate) was chosen as an example specifically to provide perspective. It is commonly consumed and has much higher (greater than 2 times) sugar content per serving than the average of the 5 granola brands I mentioned. Whether or not OJ is good or bad for the average person is irrelevant. One serving of Yevo apple cinnamon oatmeal or rice gruel, with its 18 g of sugar, has 82% of the sugar content of a glass of OJ (22 g) and significantly more than even the most sugary brand of granola among the examples in my analysis. A serving of Love Cruch granola has only 6 g of sugar and Bob’s Red Mill has only 7 g – and if you’re going to get bent out of shape about that while giving Yevo a free pass for dishing up 3 times more sugar per serving in their apple/cinnamon oatmeal and rice gruel, then you’re an idiot.

  10. Susan says:

    Vogel Said “Also, notice that I refer to Yevo’s EN43 facetiously as ”granola” because it doesn’t even meet the definition:

    “Granola: A breakfast food consisting of rolled oats, brown sugar, nuts, dried fruit, etc., usually served with milk.”
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/granola

    Granola is a very general term for a broad range of concoctions. Using your reasoning here, the same “reference.com” resource pigeon holes the definition of a cookie into a pretty narrow range of what a cookie really can be.

    There are plenty of soy based granola out on the market. Yevo granola isn’t meant to go head-to-head with a traditional granola you’d pick-up at Wholefoods or something. Yevo granola is a health food product with certain nutrition characteristics that meet a certain end goal. This goal is getting your 43 essential nutrients in the form of a meal. It is as simple as this.

    If a person doesn’t like soy based granola, and some don’t, then don’t eat it. The reason Yevo is rolling out different products is “Different strokes for different folks.”

    Just and FYI: Yevo just announced that it is moving away from a MLM structure and to a more consumer based structure. There is a referral aspect to their payment to vendors, but it is not based upon any kind of traditional MLM structure.

    So you whole argument that Yevo is a pyramid scheme just went out the window.

  11. Vogel says:

    OMG! I just found a photo of Yevo’s soy-based not-really-granola and it confirms my worst suspicions about the product. You can see the soy protein concentrate/textured vegetable protein in the form of small pellets and sediment, and it appears to be far more abundant than the oats. It looks absolutely disgusting.
    https://www.facebook.com/ChristyMartinYevo43/photos/pcb.944963152260954/944963038927632/?type=3&theater

  12. Susan says:

    Vogel said “OMG! I just found a photo of Yevo’s soy-based not-really-granola and it confirms my worst suspicions about the product.”

    It looks like most other soy based granola on the market. As I previously said, this product isn’t for everyone. Many people really like it though.

  13. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “Granola is a very general term for a broad range of concoctions.”

    Um, no, it isn’t. The term, as I showed, refers to a mix of oats, dried fruit, nuts, and sugar. Yevo’s product lacks 3 of those hallmark ingredients and consists mainly of cheap soy. It’s not granola by any stretch of the imagination.

    Susan said: “There are plenty of soy based granola out on the market.”

    Hmmm. Define “plenty”. I did a Google shopping search for “soy granola” and found not even one brand of “soy-based granola” being offered. If you know of any such product, provide a link and we can compare it to Yevo. Even if such a product exists, you surely must know already that Yevo would fail horrifically in a head-to-head comparison. It’s the nature of the MLM beast – stupidly high prices are built in as a direct result of the pyramid scheme aspect of the business.
    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=soy+granola&tbm=shop

    Susan said: “Yevo granola isn’t meant to go head-to-head with a traditional granola you’d pick-up at Wholefoods or something.”

    Obviously! That goes without saying. It would be laughed off the store shelves if it ever tried to go head-to-head with real granola at Whole Foods or any other retail store . Idiotic MLM products like Yevo’s scandalously overpriced low-grade not-really-granola can only exist in the rarefied realm of pyramid scheme snakeoil.

    Susan said: “Yevo granola is a health food product…This goal is getting your 43 essential nutrients in the form of a meal. It is as simple as this.”

    I’ve explained in great detail why that “simple” concept is beyond idiotic. You don’t dump a pile of powdered nutrients into a bowl of soy to create a foul tasting monstrosity and then call that “health food” or a “meal”. The correct term to describe it would be “punishment”.

    Susan said: “If a person doesn’t like soy based granola, and some don’t, then don’t eat it. The reason Yevo is rolling out different products is “Different strokes for different folks.”

    Really? Which folks like are “stoked” by overpaying exponentially for low-grade foul tasting crap masquerading as food; that is, aside from Yevo distributors who choke it down to qualify for measly commission payments? That would basically be no one — ever.

    Susan said: “Just and FYI: Yevo just announced that it is moving away from a MLM structure and to a more consumer based structure. There is a referral aspect to their payment to vendors, but it is not based upon any kind of traditional MLM structure. So you whole argument that Yevo is a pyramid scheme just went out the window.”

    Really? Where is this alleged announcement lurking? The company’s media page mentions nothing of the kind. Yevo apparently isn’t doing anything to duck the pyramid scheme label. Besides, you can’t seriously believe anyone would buy this horrific crap for any other reason than to be eligible for paltry MLM commissions.
    https://www.yevo43.com/media/

    Susan said: “It looks like most other soy based granola on the market. As I previously said, this product isn’t for everyone. Many people really like it though.”

    Funny, in all the of the marketing materials for Yevo’s unintentionally fish-flavored not-really-granola, I never once saw them refer to it as “soy-based granola”, even though that is in fact clearly what it is, as indicated by the product ingredient label (well at least it’s soy-based anyway; calling it “granola” is too big a stretch).

    Getting back to the value proposition, soy is cheap as dirt, and yet this product, which consists primarily of textured soy protein and contains not a speck of any premium ingredients (non-organic; no nuts, dried fruit, vanilla, etc.), sells at 6 times the average price of real granola. This garbage makes Soylent Green look good by comparison.

    And to which “other soy based granola on the market” is it that you are referring? Try providing a name and a photo to back up your claim, like I did.

    • Lazy Man says:

      Susan emailed me some marketing information that does indeed imply some kind of shift away from MLM. It still looks like MLM to me, but like an MLM that has been warned by the FTC (just my speculation).

  14. Susan says:

    Vogel said: “Really? Where is this alleged announcement lurking? The company’s media page mentions nothing of the kind”

    It is on their facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=562078533948314&id=522922857863882

    They also emailed all of the distributors.

    I don’t know why it’s not on their media page other than it really has nothing to do with their products or their mission.

    Vogel said: “Funny, in all the of the marketing materials for Yevo’s unintentionally fish-flavored not-really-granola, I never once saw them refer to it as “soy-based granola”, even though that is in fact clearly what it is, as indicated by the product ingredient label (well at least it’s soy-based anyway; calling it “granola” is too big a stretch).”

    It doesn’t smell fishy. I have a package open right now and it doesn’t even have the slightest hint of a fishy smell.

    I took your word for it about the granola being soy based, as I’d not looked closely at the ingredients. I do eat some soy based granola bars I get at whole foods and the contents of these bars look similar to the Yevo granola. This is why I made the soy comments I did earlier.

    However, I’m looking closely at the ingredients and the actual product in my hand right now and it looks more like a combination of rice krispies, oats, and probably soy flakes.

    I don’t see that this much different than any other lower calorie/diet granola. Most traditional granolas are very high calorie foods that would make most people fat if you ate it all the time.

  15. Susan says:

    Vogel said “The product’s highly unappetizing ingredient list strongly suggests otherwise. But nonetheless, it is entertaining watching you resort to vague parroted rumors and foolishly thinking that they are more compelling than the product label.”

    I missed this earlier, but you are wrong in saying I’m “parroting” about rumors of a diet study. Here is the portal where Yevo is collecting the data for diet study:

    https://www.yevo43.com/app/profile/register/?redirect_to=https://www.yevo43.com/app/

    • Lazy Man says:

      Interesting point made in the “Why the change?” section here:

      “Comp plan is at odds with our mission and promotes wrong behavior”

      From a comedic standpoint there’s also this:

      “We eliminated traditional MLM features… No Volume Requirements (except your monthly personal consumption)”

      My interpretation: “We kept the most controversial volume requirement.”

    • Lazy Man says:

      I probably should also mention this in the new marketing:

      “Eat for Free!! Yevo’s 43 for Free Program Yevo solves the biggest living expense for many families: FOOD!”

      Solving the biggest living expense with $6 a serving oatmeal? That’s more than $26,000 for a family of four to have three meals of it… and nothing else.

      Charity angle… “matching in food, dollar-for-dollar” doesn’t go far with $6 oatmeal.

      “Except South Korea
      • Market where people purchase MLM products for consumption
      • Leave alone and will stay on current compensation plan”

      So this acknowledges that people don’t purchase MLM products in the United States for consumption, right? It also says, “Hey we just gave you 16 pages of why this is superior… except that in South Korea the old way was better.”

      Hmmm, this is interesting…

      “• Shop on http://www.yev043.com lowers the barriers to become a customer
      • 15% of net sales from shop will be shared with all Nutrition
      Advocates”

      If I understand this right, you have to pay the volume requirements (be a “Nutrition Advocate”) to get a share of income of not derived by you. This looks like an investing financial security that needs to be regulated by the SEC.

  16. Vogel says:

    Susan (on Jan 29) said: “For the past month or so it [i.e., Yevo’s soy-based not-really-granola] has been used in the Yevo diet study that has been ongoing and from what I understand it is wildly popular.”

    Vogel (on Jan 30) replied: “The product’s highly unappetizing ingredient list strongly suggests otherwise. But nonetheless, it is entertaining watching you resort to vague parroted rumors and foolishly thinking that they are more compelling than the product label.”

    Susan (on Feb 8) belatedly protested: “I missed this earlier, but you are wrong in saying I’m “parroting” about rumors of a diet study. Here is the portal where Yevo is collecting the data for diet study”

    First of all, no you didn’t miss it earlier. You in fact already replied to the comment more than a week ago. I suppose you woke up this morning and decided you needed to take a Mulligan. While it can be forgiven that your cognitive processes continue to operate at a snail’s pace, the lack of substance in your latest claim cannot.
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313195

    Secondly, I wasn’t wrong. You are in fact parroting vague rumors about alleged user experiences with the product. And what you are referring to as a “study” is nothing of the kind. When you use the word “study” it implies some kind of legitimate scientific endeavor. Yevo isn’t making any attempt to capture objective verifiable data, and judging by the link you provided, there aren’t sharing any of the information they gather with the public or with Yevo distributors. So again, I repeat, you are parroting vague rumors to suggest that most people like the taste of Yevo’s soy-based faux-granola, when in fact the ingredient label assures that this low-grade concoction would border on inedible, consistent with the claims of Marsland and various distributors that the product reeks and tastes like fish and mineral powder.

    It’s not surprising that you would nonetheless try to argue, despite the facts, that people love the idea of overpaying well more than 6-fold for what could arguably be the worst cereal product ever conceived, but you’re fooling no one.

  17. Vogel says:

    More information has come to light about Yevo’s new compensation plan from a new audio recording that was just posted on YouTube last week featuring Yevo distributors Matt “MattyT” Tucciarelli and Scott Mercker (DBA: Creating Greatness) describing the details of Yevo’s soon to be launched pyramid scheme version 2.0.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPL87VsdjUw

    The gist of the new compensation plan is that the purchase of costly startup packs for distributors will no longer be required. The most plausible reason for this change is that the packages weren’t selling and the company couldn’t sign up enough new distributors to be profitable. Secondly, they seem to be making a meaningless change in terminology, now referring to “preferred customers as “customers” and to distributors as “nutrition advocates”. Third, a new 17-level compensation scheme was described.

    04:15 – Matt mentions that new revenue sharing program is slated for March 1

    04:48 – Matt: “What we know is that a lot more people are going to make a lot more money by creating a lot more greatness with the new programs systems that the company is putting in to place, and we couldn’t be more excited.”

    10:25 – Scott mentions the new plan being rolled out and says “at first blush you’re not going to like it”. Makes moronic statements like “zero selling involved, 100% sharing”.

    13:50 – Scott: “When you first share this information with people, they’re going to get to decide – which by the way is the same thing we’ve been doing since day one — in essence they’re going to get a chance to decide if they want to be a customer of if they also want to take part in the sharing plan to share Yevo with people and be able to earn income by sharing Yevo. Everything is about getting 43 nutrients into people’s bodies. Everything is about sharing on the front end — keep that in mind. So it starts with this, anybody that you share with that becomes a customer and purchases products as a customer or decides they want to participate in the plan, which if they do, they’ll no longer be called a partner/entrepreneur, they’re going to be called, they’re going to be called, they’re going to be called a nutritional advocate. They’ll be called a nutritional advocate. So that’s the new term starting March 1. They’re going to be a customer or a nutritional advocate. So if they decide they want to be either one – customer or nutritional advocate – they make a purchase of whatever they want. They can start as low as one bag of the smoothie for 38 dollars or they can mix and match and pick and pack.”

    Scott goes on to describe the percentage payouts: 40% percent of sales from new sign-up purchases in the first 30 days; 20% thereafter; 10% of sales from their new signups (i.e., second-level downline); 1% on levels 3 to 17. In other words, still a pyramid scheme!

    We’ll have to see the specifics of the new plan once it’s released in March. It can’t be worse than the old plan. Just try figuring out this pile of mumbo-jumbo.
    http://www.4healthierfoods.com/YEVO-Comp-Plan-English-111514–d602a3.pdf

  18. Vogel says:

    While reviewing the official marketing plan change announcement from Yevo, what I found most interesting was this explicit admission of guilt:

    “Yevo’s Current Compensation Plan:

    • Designed by outside consultants; a typical MLM comp plan benefiting the very few
    • Encourages recruiting network marketers
    • Discourages consumption (paid less for auto-ship orders)
    • Favors the top few distributors (top 10% make 95% of income)
    • At the expense of everyone else (majority not receiving checks)
    • Requires expensive “starter kits” (barrier to become part of Yevo)
    • Difficult to achieve early success (high attrition rates)

    Why the Change?
    • Comp plan is at odds with our mission and promotes wrong behavior”

    So in other words, the company admits to launching using a business model that was “at odds with our mission” and was wrong and unfair in virtually every conceivable respect – essentially a pyramid scheme – and now they are trying for a do-over? Amazing!

    I also found it interesting that the new plan claims that there’s “no cost to join” (page 8), which was more or less contradicted on the next page where they state that in order to be eligible for commissions/bonuses, one must commit to purchasing $100 worth of product monthly. In other words, it costs $1200 annually to be a distributor.

    What I find most amazing is that the company has F-ed up virtually everything they’ve done since day one and has been scrambling to recover ever since: i.e., they needed to reformulate their wretched tasting products within about 6 months after launching, and then had to drastically overhaul their payment structure, which by the company’s own admission, was wrong on just about every level.

    Witnessing Yevo’s many fumbles and desperate floundering is like watching a clown show — one that happens to be sad an quite un-entertaining — but a clown show nonetheless.

    Lastly, the company’s new comp plan document not only tries to promote their BS “charity” called 43ForKids (page 15), but states that they expect 100% of their distributors to donate!!! Adding insult to injury, they include an exploitative photo of a cute and presumably starving third-world child brandishing an empty food bowl.

    I already wrote a scathing analysis of Yevo’s BS charity, noting that, among other glaring red flags, it does not seem to be registered with Guidestar.org.
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-2/#comment-1312335

    But worse still, the 43 For Kids website lacks even the most basic information about the organization, like its 501(c)3 registration number, tangible descriptions of programs, how money is spent, who the directors are, where they operate, how to donate, etc. It’s complete and utter BS.
    http://43forkids.org/

  19. Susan says:

    Vogel Said: “Witnessing Yevo’s many fumbles and desperate floundering is like watching a clown show — one that happens to be sad an quite un-entertaining — but a clown show nonetheless.”

    I would expect such a comment from a government paid employee with no business experience what so ever. It’s very common for new businesses with a new product to have issues and changes need to be made. The business who understands this and is responsive is the one that usually succeeds. The ones who bullheadedly never admit they were wrong fail.

    Vogel said ” Yevo isn’t making any attempt to capture objective verifiable data, and judging by the link you provided, there aren’t sharing any of the information they gather with the public or with Yevo distributors”

    How do you know this? Do you know anything about the study or have you drawn all of your conclusions based upon the one fact that Yevo is hosting the application for doing some of the data capture?

    You are a very insightful person Vogel.

    Lazyman said “So this acknowledges that people don’t purchase MLM products in the United States for consumption, right? It also says, “Hey we just gave you 16 pages of why this is superior… except that in South Korea the old way was better.””

    Korea loves network marketing. There is no stigma with MLMs in Korea like there is here in the US. Do a little reading on S. Korea and MLMs. They are very very popular there. Also, I believe the S. Korea branch of Yevo is actually an entirely stand along company.

    • Lazy Man says:

      Susan,

      I have some Filipino friends who know how popular MLM is there. Not saying it is the same as South Korea, but she says, there’s simply not the level of education to protect consumers there. It’s an entirely different class system.

      It’s also worth noting that China is ahead of the game realizing that MLMs are pyramid schemes and banning them outright.

      The point I was trying to make is that the people in Yevo were not now to MLM. They knew exactly what it was… and touted years and years of experience. Now they appear to be saying, “Hey what we were doing for years was wrong. We could correct the problem everywhere, but we’ll consciously choose to continue to make the mistakes in South Korea.”

      It doesn’t make any sense even if it is more accepted there. Be a leader and make change for good. If it’s a standalone company it seems to share some things or else it wouldn’t be mentioned in the same update.

  20. Vogel says:

    Vogel said: “Really? Where is this alleged announcement lurking? The company’s media page mentions nothing of the kind”

    Susan replied: “It is on their facebook page”
    https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=562078533948314&id=522922857863882”

    Another blatant act of deception on Susan’s part. It is not on “their” (i.e., the company’s) Facebook page. The page Susan linked to was that of an independent distributor (and is clearly labeled as such) based in Boston. The distributor didn’t even have balls enough to reveal their identify; instead the FB page provides a link to a Yevo sales site DBA as “YY Global, LLC.” However, the e-mail contact link on that page provides an address to the account of milbanksystemsllc.com, which appears to be the website of a Boston photographer named Mike Whitby, but is in fact registered anonymously.
    https://yyglobal.myyevo.com/
    http://www.milbanksystemsllc.com/#!about/c786
    http://www.networksolutions.com/whois/results.jsp?domain=milbanksystemsllc.com

    Interestingly, the phone number provided on the distributor’s FB page ((781) 962-9998) appears to be connected with some kind of identity scam.
    http://xdd2.com/phn/781/962/9998/(781)962-9998/0

    If Susan were ever to say something about Yevo that wasn’t shrouded in mystery and BS, it would be a F-ing miracle.

  21. Susan says:

    Vogel Said “Another blatant act of deception on Susan’s part. It is not on “their” (i.e., the company’s) Facebook page. The page Susan linked to was that of an independent distributor (and is clearly labeled as such) based in Boston.”

    It wasn’t my intention to be deceptive. I initially thought this was Yevo’s facebook page (which I don’t visit often). This doesn’t change the fact that Yevo is changing their compensation plan and I’ve been as forthright with this information as I can. I don’t know why it isn’t on their media page yet.

    Lazyman said “I have some Filipino friends who know how popular MLM is there. Not saying it is the same as South Korea, but she says, there’s simply not the level of education to protect consumers there. It’s an entirely different class system.”

    South Korea is more like Japan than the Philippians or China. It is a quite advanced country. We here in the US don’t think of them this way because of the backwater neighbors to the North.

  22. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “I would expect such a comment from a government paid employee with no business experience what so ever.”

    Huh? I never said I was a “government paid employee” or that I had “no business experience”. I didn’t say anything about my background at all. It just adds to the unintentional comedy factor when you take these random shots in the dark, trying to manufacture a back story for me.

    Susan said: “It’s very common for new businesses with a new product to have issues and changes need to be made. The business who understands this and is responsive is the one that usually succeeds. The ones who bullheadedly never admit they were wrong fail.”

    Um, the ones that F up constantly from the moment of inception, like Yevo, are the very embodiment of failure. It is written all over everything this company does and in every desperate word you post on this blog.

    Vogel said: “Yevo isn’t making any attempt to capture objective verifiable data, and judging by the link you provided, there aren’t sharing any of the information they gather with the public or with Yevo distributors”

    Susan replied: “How do you know this? Do you know anything about the study or have you drawn all of your conclusions based upon the one fact that Yevo is hosting the application for doing some of the data capture?”

    Well, dolt, I can see the input form on the page you linked to. That alone is sufficient to demonstrate the absurdity of calling what they’re doing a “study”. But you’re just dodging the issue now. In a failed attempt to rebut my criticism of Yevo’s soy-based not-really-granola, you claimed that this alleged “study” reported that the product was “wildly popular”. I justifiably called BS. Live with it or prove me wrong.

  23. Vogel says:

    Let’s recap the line of discussion I started about the wretchedness of Yevo’s soy-based not-really-granola, and which Susan derailed with hearsay BS about an alleged “study” purported to show that the product was “wildly popular”.

    Vogel (Jan 28) said: “Now with the cost comparisons of non-MLM products versus Yevo’s mashed potato powder, frijoles, not-a-smoothies, and oatmeal out of the way, the next product to consider is their newly launched granola. Once again, as expected, Yevo fails in horrific fashion…”

    Susan (Jan 29) said: “For the past month or so it [i.e., Yevo’s soy-based not-really-granola] has been used in the Yevo diet study that has been ongoing and from what I understand it is wildly popular.”

    Vogel (Jan 30) replied: “The product’s highly unappetizing ingredient list strongly suggests otherwise. But nonetheless, it is entertaining watching you resort to vague parroted rumors and foolishly thinking that they are more compelling than the product label.”

    Susan (Feb 8) belatedly protested: “I missed this earlier, but you are wrong in saying I’m “parroting” about rumors of a diet study. Here is the portal where Yevo is collecting the data for diet study”
    https://www.yevo43.com/app/profile/register/?redirect_to=https://www.yevo43.com/app/#sthash.Xo0QKeU6.dpuf

    Vogel said (Feb 8): “Yevo isn’t making any attempt to capture objective verifiable data, and judging by the link you provided, there aren’t sharing any of the information they gather with the public or with Yevo distributors.”

    Susan replied (Feb 8): “How do you know this? Do you know anything about the study or have you drawn all of your conclusions based upon the one fact that Yevo is hosting the application for doing some of the data capture?”

    Susan, you need to drop this deceptive charade of pretending that Yevo’s promotional offer is a “study”. It’s BS and you know it. The terms and conditions of the promotional offer, dubbed by the company as the “Essential Nutrient Weight Management Program” and “43 For Weight Management”, make that abundantly clear. It is not a study in any remotely meaningful sense of the word. Here are some choice excerpts in the absurdly long (roughly 25 pages!) Terms and Conditions document that Susan linked to:

    – In order to be eligible to participate in the “43 for WM”, you must be a distributor or preferred customer or customer in good standing…”
    – Yevo will select no more than 150 participants to take part in this weight loss management program
    – Yevo may choose participants based on any criteria
    – If you are selected as one of the participants in the 43 for WM, you may be eligible for a refund of $300.00 of the $400.00 program cost you pay each month for meals used during the 3 month duration of the program.
    – The EN43 weight loss program is currently a beta program and subject to change.
    – The information regarding the beta program and/or its participants is confidential. As such, information concerning the program IS TO NOT BE SHARED IN ANY WAY ON ANY SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORM
    – In general, communications outside of your family and team are prohibited. Failure to comply with this, at Yevo’s complete discretion, may result in termination from participation in the beta program.
    – For each month you order and pay for a 43 for WM meal pack at a cost of $400.00, you may qualify for a rebate of $300.00 from Yevo for that month if you…consume the following between these dates: Jan 4th – Jan 24th, three Yevo meals a day; two Yevo snacks a day…Jan 25th – Mar 31st, two Yevo Meals a day, two Yevo Snacks a day…enter requested information into the mobile app…daily/weekly…at the end of each phase…submit requested photos…two before photos…by January 2nd…two after photos…by January 30th…two after photos…by April 5th…submit requested videos…“Why” video – by January 2nd
    Journal video – minimum 20 second – 2x per week – starting January 3rd…45 second (or longer) video…by January 31st…45 second (or longer) video…by April 5th
    – Yevo will process a refund of $300.00 which will be sent to the card your purchase was made with
    Determinations made by Yevo about whether you qualify or not for the refund are final and not subject to appeal or dispute.
    – You are responsible for paying any taxes that may be incurred through participation in this program, if any, that may become due and owing.
    – I authorize Yevo to use my name, image, photograph, personal story and/or likeness, video, film, audio and/or tape that it has of me, (hereinafter referred to as the “Materials”) in advertising or promotional materials and waive all claims to remuneration for such use and grant the absolute and irrevocable right and permission…To use, re-use, publish and re-publish (with no limitation on times used) the same in whole or in part, with intentional or unintentional alterations, without limitation as to optical or audio effect, individually or in conjunction with other photographs, images or audio, in any medium and for any purpose whatsoever, including (but not by way of limitation) illustration, promotion, advertising and trade; and, To use my name, a fictitious name, or no name in connection therewith.
    – I hereby release and discharge Yevo (and related entities), its successors, executives, assigns and any designated agents (including any agency, client, broadcaster, periodical or other publication) from any and all claims and demands arising out of or in connection with the use of the Materials, including but not limited to any claims for defamation or invasion of privacy.

    So here we see that what Susan is calling a “study” is in fact a marketing gimmick designed to glean promotional testimonials and $400 from each participant, and has no possibility of generating reliable data. The participation criteria are arbitrary; the participants, who are already either distributors or customers rather than naive subjects, are financially incentivized with a $300 subsidy (which they may or may not receive at the company’s discretion); the participants self-report whatever data they choose to submit (i.e., there is no objective independent data collection); and they ultimately agree to have their likeness and details used as marketing fodder, to be presented and altered in any manner in which the company sees fit, with no legal recourse for the participant. To make matters worse, the $300 rebate they (may or may not) receive is taxable; the participant has to sift through a Terms and Conditions document that’s more than 25+ pages long and contains numerous onerous restrictions; and to earn it, the participant has to make the Herculean effort of inputting information on a daily basis, providing 3 different sets of photos, and making close to 30 videos over a 3-month span.

    But by far the worst of all is that participants have to survive solely on this F-ing garbage synthetic food powder BS for 20 day straight days, and then almost exclusively (except for one meal per day) for another 9 weeks. That’s 20 days without any real food – no fruit, no vegetables, nothing organic, nothing that doesn’t come out of a pouch and stink like rotten fish.

    Not only is this program not a study, in any sane sense of the word, it’s more like medieval torture. There isn’t a credible independent nutrition authority in the world that would condone such abhorrent nutritional practices or any company that promotes them.

  24. Susan says:

    Vogel said “Huh? I never said I was a “government paid employee” or that I had “no business experience”. I didn’t say anything about my background at all. It just adds to the unintentional comedy factor when you take these random shots in the dark, trying to manufacture a back story for me.”

    It is simply a matter of deduction. You’ve posted enough information about yourself here and in a few other related websites to make this conclusion.

    Vogel said “Um, the ones that F up constantly from the moment of inception, like Yevo, are the very embodiment of failure. It is written all over everything this company does and in every desperate word you post on this blog”

    This is a completely ignorant comment. One has to look no further than the Apple Lisa or Microsoft Vista, two epic failure products by two of the most successful companies in the history of mankind, to see that failed attempts don’t make a company a failure. It is what they ultimately do about it. When a company is willing to admit failure and change, then this is a making of success.

    Vogel said “Well, dolt, I can see the input form on the page you linked to. That alone is sufficient to demonstrate the absurdity of calling what they’re doing a “study”. But you’re just dodging the issue now. In a failed attempt to rebut my criticism of Yevo’s soy-based not-really-granola, you claimed that this alleged “study” reported that the product was “wildly popular”. I justifiably called BS. Live with it or prove me wrong.”

    Why do I need to rebut stupidity? I’ve already shown and established that many other companies make soy based granola. The Yevo Granola is very similar in taste and texture to these others. It’s just fortified with 43 essential nutrients as well. If soy based granolas are so bad, then why do people buy them?

  25. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “It is simply a matter of deduction. You’ve posted enough information about yourself here and in a few other related websites to make this conclusion.”

    No, in fact I haven’t posted any information that should suggest to you that I work for government or that I failed in business. That’s simply something you invented out of thin air and now you’re doubling down on that lie with even more BS.

    Susan said: “This is a completely ignorant comment. One has to look no further than the Apple Lisa or Microsoft Vista.”

    Look idiot, you’re not Apple or Microsoft, and the latter had a string of stunning successes before missing the mark slightly with Vista. Your joke of a company can’t even make cereal or design a pyramid scheme compensation plan without F-ing it up in spectacular fashion.

    Susan said: “Why do I need to rebut stupidity? I’ve already shown and established that many other companies make soy based granola.”

    No, lying ass, in fact you didn’t even provide one example of any other soy-based granola. I asked you to and you never replied. What you said previously was:

    “There are plenty of soy based granola out on the market.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313238

    “It looks like most other soy based granola on the market.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313431

    To which I replied:

    “Hmmm. Define “plenty”. I did a Google shopping search for “soy granola” and found not even one brand of “soy-based granola” being offered. If you know of any such product, provide a link and we can compare it to Yevo.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313445

    And now you’re lying your ass off by pretending that you gave examples when you never did. You’re such an asshole! A perfect fit for Yevo!

  26. Adam says:

    Morbid curiosity and a desire to hear the far off whistle of “Sweet Georgia Brown” made me stop in. I have to admit, Susan, you are relentless. It’s like cool hand luke, except sometimes nothing is not a cool hand at all.

    Apple and Microsoft may have had a couple of problematic software/hardware debacles, but they aren’t making food or drink, are they? A company producing processed food products does not have the same margin of error, nor were Apple and Microsoft startups when they had issues. You may as well bring up the Edsel as an example.

    Yevos product is the “opportunity”, not the “oatmeal” or soynola or “smoothie”. And it isn’t that there’s a stigma against MLM in the US, it’s that people here have had a few generations to figure out that MLM is just a way of getting taken for a very expensive and stress filled ride.

    I really hope you are right about Vogel working for the government. I would know that at least some of my tax dollars are being very well spent, whatever job he is doing.

  27. Susan says:

    Vogel said “Look idiot, you’re not Apple or Microsoft, and the latter had a string of stunning successes before missing the mark slightly with Vista.”

    Where did I say Yevo was like Apple or MS? I made the statement that any good company goes through failures.

    Vista was FAR from the first time Microsoft experienced epic failure. Go back to DOS version 4. MS has failed nearly as many times as they have succeeded: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/6-operating-systems-that-failed-miserably/

    Again, their success isn’t defined by their failures, but how they learned from these failures and moved on.

    Vogel said ““Hmmm. Define “plenty”. I did a Google shopping search for “soy granola” and found not even one brand of “soy-based granola” being offered. If you know of any such product, provide a link and we can compare it to Yevo.”

    You can’t be serious? You are just playing like you are a complete idiot right?

    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#safe=active&q=soy+granola

  28. Susan says:

    Adam said “Apple and Microsoft may have had a couple of problematic software/hardware debacles, but they aren’t making food or drink, are they?”

    Both have had dozens and dozens of debacles. HUGE tens and even hundreds of million dollar debacles.

    What do you figure MS spent on this: http://www.wired.com/2010/06/four-reasons-why-microsofts-kin-phone-failed/

    Try billion with a B.

    • Lazy Man says:

      Not that it matters, but I don’t think the Kin was a billion dollar loss for Microsoft… considering they pulled it in 6 weeks (source). In fact that source cites “cost millions.”

      It’s also worth noting that the failure was attributed largely to Verizon pricing it as a smart phone, when it really wasn’t as noted here. Verizon’s expensive plan pricing didn’t work for the teenage intended audience.

      In any case, let’s get back on the topic… no more Microsoft and Apple talk.

  29. Vogel says:

    Yevo A-hole (trolling as “Susan” said): “There are plenty of soy based granola out on the market.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313238

    “It looks like most other soy based granola on the market.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313431

    Vogel said: “Hmmm. Define ‘plenty’. I did a Google shopping search for ‘soy granola’ and found not even one brand of ‘soy-based granola’ being offered. If you know of any such product, provide a link and we can compare it to Yevo.”

    Yevo A-hole replied: You can’t be serious? You are just playing like you are a complete idiot right?
    https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#safe=active&q=soy+granola

    Wow, you are such a F-ing dick you make regular F-ing dicks cringe with embarrassment. There isn’t a single brand of soy-based granola on the Google search page you linked to. You apparently don’t even bother looking at the content you’re posting — you just spew random nonsensical shit on the page and then tuck tail and run. The challenge to you remains – you claimed there are “plenty” of brands of “soy-based granola out on the market”, so name them, asshole!

  30. Susan says:

    Vogel, someone needs to wash you mouth out with soap.

    I find it incredibly telling that you can dig around on the internet and find all of this minutiae when you believe you are right. Soon as someone proves you wrong, you wrong you can’t find the side of a big red barn staring you in the face. There are dozens of types. I have a box of krueger granola bars in my cubbord right now that are soy based. Other brands include Dorset, Udi’s Granola, SoyJoy All Natural Granola, Gow Raw Granola. This list goes on and on.

    Furthermore, I already pointed out earlier that the ingredients were not 100% soy. If you look at my previous post, I pointed out the puffed rice, rolled oats, and may other things in the Yevo granola.

    Your biggest problem is you can’t admit it when you are dead wrong, which is quite clearly the case here. When someone shows in black and white you are wrong, you resort to school yard name calling.

    I take back my comments about you being a government employed researcher. I’m now thinking you are some 30 something kid who hasn’t moved out of his moms house and sits in front of his xbox all day playing video games and calling people names on backwater blogs.

    • Lazy Man says:

      It’s funny, but whenever someone is proven wrong in MLM they turn to an image of “You are some 30-something kid in Mom’s basement playing videogames on an Xbox.”

      The strange thing is that even if it were true, it would be a lot more productive than luring people into pyramid schemes by calling them MLMs.

    • Evan says:

      Susan,

      Watching you argue with Vogel is HYSTERICAL. Who the fuck cares if there are other soy based products out there? Is your product three times the cost? Probably. Is there a reason other than the comp arrangement? Probably not. That is basically the end of the story.

      You can’t honestly believe that Yevo is the next big thing in nutrition? Can you? It’ll go the way of all the MLMs and Pyramid Schemes that LM highlights.

      Post idea for LM – share all the ones that have gone defunct since you went on your crusade.

    • Lazy Man says:

      That’s a great idea Evan. I did something like that here: Reviewing a 6 Year War on MLMs. It’s a couple of years later so there are a few more to add to the list.

  31. Vogel says:

    The Yevo Troll That Calls Itself “Susan” said: I “I find it incredibly telling that you can dig around on the internet and find all of this minutiae when you believe you are right. Soon as someone proves you wrong, you wrong you can’t find the side of a big red barn staring you in the face.”

    ROFL! You did not even come close to proving me wrong. In fact, until now, you didn’t even make the slightest effort to do so, and your latest attempt was laughably feeble.

    I provide sources to support my own arguments; you are simply expected to do the same, and yet you did not. In my detailed critical evaluation of Yevo’s not-at-all-granola, I pointed out that the product was soy-based (i.e., soy being the number 1 ingredient) and lacked basic hallmark granola ingredients like fruit, nuts, vanilla, etc., which not only would fail to justify Yevo’s greater than 6-fold plus price premium but would in fact set the product apart in a very low-end category virtually all by itself. In response, you twice claimed, out of the blue, that there are “plenty” of “soy based granola on the market”, without presenting a stitch of corroborating evidence. After I continued to challenge you to produce evidence to back up your claim, you came back with a link to a Google search page that didn’t contain a single example of a soy-based granola, and to top it off you had the gall to call me stupid!

    The Yevo Troll Who Calls Itself “Susan” said: “There are dozens of types. I have a box of krueger granola bars in my cubbord right now that are soy based. Other brands include Dorset, Udi’s Granola, SoyJoy All Natural Granola, Gow Raw Granola. This list goes on and on.”

    At least now you’re finally naming some brand names, and with that, your argument can be resoundingly trounced. All of the discussion and comparisons to date have been about various brands of granola cereal, not granola bars. A granola bar is obviously not the same as granola cereal. It can only be assumed that you are too dense to understand that such a distinction exists and why it matters, or you’ve simply resorted to more of your usual pissy weak-ass BS in a futile last ditch effort to save a tiny bit of face.

    But for the record, the #1 ingredient in your Kroger granola bars is whole grain rolled oats, not soy. http://www.fooducate.com/app#!page=product&id=85E2486E-E105-11DF-A102-FEFD45A4D471

    Furthermore, Go Raw granola brags that their entire production facility is soy-free! https://www.goraw.com/t/faq

    And for that matter, Udi’s granola is soy free too
    http://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-79793-udi-s-granola-original-12-oz?redirect=1

    And there’s no soy concentrate in Dorset granola either.
    https://www.dorsetcereals.co.uk/things-we-make/granola/oat-granola/

    And lastly, there’s no such product as “SoyJoy All Natural Granola”.
    http://us.soyjoy.com/
    https://www.google.com/search?q=SoyJoy+all-natural+granola&rlz=1C1VFKB_enUS661US661&biw=1536&bih=766&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiI7sjKw-7KAhVG1mMKHSGcD2IQ_AUIKygA

    Once again, “Susan” you fail in a fashion that is so spectacular, the word epic doesn’t even begin to do it justice. I’m at a rare loss for words when it comes to describing what kind of worthless asshole you are.

    The Yevo Troll Who Calls Itself “Susan” said: “Your biggest problem is you can’t admit it when you are dead wrong, which is quite clearly the case here. When someone shows in black and white you are wrong, you resort to school yard name calling.”

    Deep down you know that you have far greater and more deeply entrenched problems than that – hypocrisy and sociopathic dishonesty being chief among them. I have proven you so wrong so many times over that’s it’s a miracle you still have the audacity to keep coming back for more. You haven’t even come close to proving me wrong. You probably fantasize about it happening though — so that you could gloat about it endlessly, completely missing the point of Matthew 7:3, and despite the fact that you’re batting zero to date.

    • Evan says:

      Susan,

      I think you may have took my hysterical comment as I was laughing with you at Vogel. Sorry, No. I was laughing (literally at some points) at you going up against vogel on the topic of nutrition and/or analysis thereof.

      Your open debate, while making you feel better, does nothing to support Yevo as a company or MLM scheme. Vogel would have had nothing to talk about for the past 225 comments are so, if you didn’t (terribly) engage him. So all you have done, and my guess is continue to do, is provide reasonable doubt for anyone that is thinking about Yevo.

      Notwithstanding, you bring laughter to my life when I get the email updates. So thank you.

  32. Susan says:

    Evan,

    I find it quite hysterical myself. What makes a grown man come on a blog and get so worked up and start name calling and ranting over something so trivial? Here’s a guy who easily spends hours researching the information he does and for what? Do you really think anyone really give a rats ass what Vogel thinks? He’s just some rude ass on here who is probably a arrogant know it all in real life. Like I stated earlier, I’ve run across his type in the University system. He has got institutional researcher written all over him. They are a bunch of back biting children clawing at each other for the next round of grant and research money.

    I really don’t care about the the other soy products either. I was only making the point that Vogel is dead WRONG. If you look back through this conversation you will see it was Vogel who started this entire soy discussion. This is his MO. He starts a completely useless discussion about something, then when you refute is off the wall comments he goes off the deep end with endless and completely useless information. Seriously, WHO CARES if Yevo granola is made from Soy. If you don’t like it, don’t eat it. Nobody is pouring any of this down anyone’s throats. I happen to like it as do others I’ve talked to.

    Another example of mindless minutia nobody cares about: Go back and re-read the section on the sweetener in Yevo products. At the end of the day: Who cares?!?!?! It’s an artificial sweetener. Vogel acted like they were putting cyanide in the products or something.

    I’m not saying there aren’t some bad MLMs out there. I will completely agree that there are bad MLMs. However, Yevo is not one of them. They are in this for the long haul. They are serious about the idea of getting people nutrients the vast majority aren’t getting by way of food instead of taking a tablet or some other supplement. I believe their recent change in their compensation plan is testament to their commitment to this fact.

    While I’m at it, I will point out that Lazyman’s article is incorrect in stating that Paul Myhill is part of Yevo Corporate. Nothing could be further from the truth. Paul is not at all involved with Yevo corporate and was just a regular distributor. Incidentally, Paul (and his wife) is probably one of the most humanitarian people I’ve ever run across. He spends most of his time since his protandim days doing missions work in third world countries, helping children. The Yevo business center he started was totally for his charity work — all of the revenue went to the charity work he does. The main reason I bring this up is I re-read Lazyman’s article and don’t think it’s fair to put down Paul Myhill the way it seems to be doing.

    I believe I’ve been respectful and mostly polite and I’m not getting up on a soap box and spewing network marketing jargon. I’ve been debating the topics being discussed. I’ve even emailed Lazyman offlist and thanked him for treating me fairly and I sent him information relevant to the topics being discussed to help him with his moderation of comments. Isn’t the point of these comments to debate the topic at hand or is it all one sided bashing of Yevo?

    • Lazy Man says:

      Susan,

      MLM/Pyramid schemes are a very, very big issue and hurt many, many people. They really isn’t trivial at all.

      Many people care a ton of what Vogel thinks. I know, I get emails saying, “Can you ask Vogel about [x] or [y]?” He’s earned that because he’s been great information for years now.

      You’ve already pinned about 7 careers on Vogel… so good job there. Keep going and maybe you’ll cover them all.

      A LOT of people care about soy in their products. One of the biggest knocks against ViSalus was that they used soy in their products. If you are going to try to sell a premium priced health product, I don’t know why you’d even consider it.

      Susan said, “I’m not saying there aren’t some bad MLMs out there. I will completely agree that there are bad MLMs.”

      I have a standard offer for anyone to show me a single GOOD MLM. No one has been able to do it. Someone mentioned SolaVei, but it shut down at the end of last year. And even that company was criticized for being a pyramid scheme (according to the Geekwire article that I cited).

      My article was written and published BEFORE Yevo launched. I have admitted that it may be time for an update… especially with all the information that Vogel has brought to the table. Unfortunately, I don’t have unlimited time. As I showed in the article Myhill’s Facebook page showed that he was on the ground-floor of the company… collecting salespeople’s information before even the name was released.

      I’m not going to further comment on Myhill. In general you should be careful of charitywashing. For example, if you read up on the car donation charities, many of them seem to exist simply to provide the people running the charity a 6-figure income. I’m not saying that’s what Myhill is doing… I don’t know. I’m saying, don’t rule it out.

      One thing we can agree on is that Myhill had no need for a Yevo business center for his charity work… he already had the Traffic Jam entity set up.

  33. Vogel says:

    Susan (Jan 14) said: “Quite clearly, you are either a faculty member at a university somewhere or a researcher.”
    https://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-3/#comment-1312572

    Susan (Jan 14) said: “I’m not grasping at straws about your profession. There no doubt in my mind about this fact.”
    https://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-3/#comment-1312612

    Susan (Feb 8) said: “I would expect such a comment from a government paid employee with no business experience what so ever.”
    https://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313523

    Susan said (Feb 10) said:: “I take back my comments about you being a government employed researcher. I’m now thinking you are some 30 something kid who hasn’t moved out of his moms house and sits in front of his xbox all day playing video games and calling people names on backwater blogs.”
    https://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313613

    Susan (Feb 10) said: “Like I stated earlier, I’ve run across his type in the University system. He has got institutional researcher written all over him. They are a bunch of back biting children clawing at each other for the next round of grant and research money.”
    https://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313628

    Professor…no doubt about it…no wait, make that government worker…no scratch that…definitely not a government researcher…30-year old Xbox champ mama’s boy…oops, no, it’s university researcher for sure, no doubt about it this time.

    Looks like Susan’s psych medication is wearing off. Can’t seem to keep the delusions in her head consistent for more than a couple of days at a time. It’s mildly amusing watching this repugnant Yevo troll a-hole bending over backwards to divert attention away from the facts being presented – like the fact that Yevo is selling low-quality soy-based crap, which they have temerity to refer to as “granola”, for more than 6 times the average price of much higher quality real “granola”, and aren’t being sold by a bunch of pyramid scheme recidivists recycled from the ashes of Metabolife – the company that killed, lied, and stole.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metabolife

    You leave no doubt in anyone’s mind what you are Susan. And if you weren’t so morally and ethically stunted, it should fill with you shame.

  34. Susan says:

    Vogel said: “Professor…no doubt about it…no wait, make that government worker…no scratch that…definitely not a government researcher…30-year old Xbox champ mama’s boy…oops, no, it’s university researcher for sure, no doubt about it this time”

    Aren’t the vast majority of university workers government employees? They receive their paychecks from government entities, ergo they are government workers.

    Therefore, I’ve only stated 2 different professions: A: Government Worker B: Mama’s Xbox boy.

    Vogel “You leave no doubt in anyone’s mind what you are Susan. And if you weren’t so morally and ethically stunted, it should fill with you shame.”

    Who’s everybody? You and a few of the Lazyman blog cronies?

    I’ve consistently been level headed and mostly polite while you go off on your cursing, rants and tirades.

    You are a researcher Vogel. Look at the data empirically here. Look at the strings of cursing and rants you’ve made versus my responses. Based upon this data, which one of us appears to be coming off psych medication?

    As an “academic” you have obviously mastered the art of written debate. I concede that you are very good at taking minutia and twisting into a convincing argument. You’ll take a single out of context comment from, say, Marsland and combine it with a slew of web links and then come up with a conclusion: Well obviously this is what he was saying and this is what they are doing.

    The entire soy debate and the entire artificial sweetener debate fall squarely in this category.

    At the end of the day what did all of your minutia prove? 1) Yevo uses artificial sweeteners that are a potassium salt. 2) Yevo granola includes soy as one of the ingredients.

    Both of these are facts stated by the manufacture and the marketing materials. Your arguments proved exactly NOTHING.

    • Lazy Man says:

      Susan, there are a lot of universities out there without that have no government employee relationship. For example, I am fairly sure a professor for Boston University has a private agreement with the private University and not some kind of government employee contract. I’m not sure about state schools, but it’s still probably a stretch to consider their professors government workers.

  35. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “I really don’t care about the the other soy products either. I was only making the point that Vogel is dead WRONG.”

    What you have done is abandoned any pretense of an honest debate. After being proven hopelessly wrong time and time again, you simply turn around and, like a fool, unilaterally declare yourself the victor.

    Susan: “If you look back through this conversation you will see it was Vogel who started this entire soy discussion. This is his MO. He starts a completely useless discussion about something, then when you refute is off the wall comments he goes off the deep end with endless and completely useless information. Seriously, WHO CARES if Yevo granola is made from Soy. If you don’t like it, don’t eat it. Nobody is pouring any of this down anyone’s throats. I happen to like it as do others I’ve talked to.”

    They could make it out of dog shit for all I care. The simple fact is that soy is a cheap ingredient and Yevo’s soy-based not-granola is a cheap quality product. It lacks the premium ingredients (fruit, nuts, honey, vanilla, etc.) that are the defining characteristics of granola and which are present in every one of the half dozen or so brands of “real” oat-based granola included in my analysis. The product does not contain anything that would justify its absurdly high price premium (greater than 6-fold) over retail brands. In fact, given its makeup, it should be much less expensive, but since there’s an underlying pyramid scheme to support, the price is jacked up to the point of absurdity and deceptive marketing is used in attempt to create a false perception of value. Adding insult to injury, Yevo’s products are reported to taste and smell like fish due to unintentional fat and protein oxidation.

    If you want to overpay heftily for Yevo and eat their fish-flavored textured soy concentrate drenched with calcium and potassium powder, knock yourself out. But don’t expect anyone to buy into the patently absurd and demonstrably false notion that Yevo is offering a premium product or a good value.

    Susan said: “Go back and re-read the section on the sweetener in Yevo products. At the end of the day: Who cares?!?!?! It’s an artificial sweetener. Vogel acted like they were putting cyanide in the products or something.”

    Hardly. But people who read food labels and are concerned about the ingredients they consume would tend to shun a product with ACE-K in it, and it matters when doing a meaningful comparison with other products (BTW, I mainly hammered Yevo on the ACE-K issue because Marlsland was feigning that it was a significant source of potassium). I’d love to see Yevo try to market this garbage with full transparency. Put a label on the front of the product that proudly proclaims “fish-scented textured soy-based cereal sweetened with potassium acesulfame”, and see how that goes.

    Susan said: “I’m not saying there aren’t some bad MLMs out there. I will completely agree that there are bad MLMs. However, Yevo is not one of them.”

    Au contraire. Yevo’s are arguably the worst, most ill-conceived products in the history of MLM, an industry notorious for terrible ill-conceived products. The numerous product comparisons I have made to date prove unequivocally that what they are offering is absurdly overpriced shit.

    Susan said: “They are serious about the idea of getting people nutrients the vast majority aren’t getting by way of food instead of taking a tablet or some other supplement.”

    That notion, as has been pointed out repeatedly, is dazzlingly idiotic. They are simply taking the equivalent of a bunch of supplement pills and dumping them into to dishes of quasi-food where they don’t belong. To make matters worse they are promoting a diet devoid of fruits and vegetables – the antithesis of what all nutritional experts recognize as the basis of a healthy diet.

    Susan said: “I believe their recent change in their compensation plan is testament to their commitment to this fact.”

    The new 17-level pyramid scheme plan is a commitment to what exactly? Stealing from rubes? Trying to jam fish-flavored powdered Franken-foods down people’s throats so that the kingpins can laugh all the way to the bank?

    Susan said: “Paul Myhill…spends most of his time since his protandim days doing missions work in third world countries, helping children.”

    Eesh! I wouldn’t let that fool within a mile of a child. Once upon a time, Myhill set up a charity based out of his home in Castle Rock, paid himself a nice salary from it, and wrote off part of his mortgage; and despite pouring through his Traffic Jam Campaign website, I’ve seen no concrete evidence of his helping anyone. In fact, according to his Linkedin page, Myhill’s involvement with these so-called “charities” ended in 2014.
    http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocuments//2012/201/437/2012-201437471-0999e292-9.pdf
    http://trafficjam.org/
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulrmyhill

    There are countless children’s charities in the world that are more deserving of our dollars and respect than whatever the F it is that Myhill was doing with his 501(c)3. Furthermore, it’s unforgivable to deceive and rip people off with BS pyramid scheme products, no matter what Myhill does with the proceeds. He’s proverbially robbing Peter to pay Paul (and, most notably, himself).

    Susan: “The Yevo business center he started was totally for his charity work — all of the revenue went to the charity work he does.”

    First, how would you know and where is your evidence? Second, you’re dead wrong. The 2012 IRS990 for Traffic Jam shows that the Myhill’s took close to $50K in compensation, $14K in benefits, and a $51K occupancy write-off.

    Susan said: “I believe I’ve been respectful and mostly polite and I’m not getting up on a soap box and spewing network marketing jargon. I’ve been debating the topics being discussed.”

    In epic fashion, you’ve lost every point that you’ve feebly attempted to debate. You have lied your ass off repeatedly, purposely refused to acknowledge any criticism no matter how well founded, and generally acted like a dimwitted ass. Despite that, you want a pat on the back for being “respectful and mostly polite”? You haven’t even been respectful or polite. You’re a sick predator and a colossal asshole.

  36. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “While I’m at it, I will point out that Lazyman’s article is incorrect in stating that Paul Myhill is part of Yevo Corporate.”

    Except Lazy Man’s article never stated that Myhill is part of Yevo corporate. Way to slay another straw-man Suzie. Lying ass!

  37. Susan says:

    Vogel said “Except Lazy Man’s article never stated that Myhill is part of Yevo corporate. Way to slay another straw-man Suzie”

    Apparently in Vogel’s latest conniption fit he forgot how to read. If you just scroll up the page a bit you will see the following:

    “So imagine my surprise when a friend wrote me the very next day saying, (paraphrased) “Did you see that Paul Myhill is starting a new MLM company?”

    It turns out that this company is Yevo.”

    Paul Myhill did not start Yevo nor is he part of the “company.”

    He was nothing more than a distributor.

    Lazyman took posts from Paul’s social media page where he asked his followers what they thought and make the assumption Paul was the one starting the company. This is an incorrect assumption.

    So, Vogel, where is the lie in all of this?

  38. Susan says:

    Vogel Said” “Put a label on the front of the product that proudly proclaims “fish-scented textured soy-based cereal sweetened with potassium acesulfame”, and see how that goes.”

    There isn’t any fish scent what so ever with the granola. What proof do you have of this?

    Vogel Said: “First, how would you know and where is your evidence? Second, you’re dead wrong. The 2012 IRS990 for Traffic Jam shows that the Myhill’s took close to $50K in compensation, $14K in benefits, and a $51K occupancy write-off.”

    Are you a complete retard Vogel? Yevo didn’t even exist until 2014. How can a company that didn’t exist in 2014 be related to IRS filings in 2012? This is yet another example of you trying to link completely unrelated minutia to one of your worthless arguments.

  39. Vogel says:

    Lazy Man (initially) said: “So imagine my surprise when a friend wrote me the very next day saying, (paraphrased) “Did you see that Paul Myhill is starting a new MLM company?”

    Susan (slaying a straw-man) said: “Lazyman’s article is incorrect in stating that Paul Myhill is part of Yevo Corporate.”

    Vogel (noting Susan’s fallacy) said “Except Lazy Man’s article never stated that Myhill is part of Yevo corporate. Way to slay another straw-man Suzie”

    Susan (doubling down on her fallacious argument) said: “Apparently in Vogel’s latest conniption fit he forgot how to read…Paul Myhill did not start Yevo nor is he part of the “company.” He was nothing more than a distributor…So, Vogel, where is the lie in all of this?”

    The lie couldn’t be more obvious. You said that Lazy Man’s article stated that Myhill is “part of Yevo corporate”. He clearly did not state that; hence my comment about you slaying straw-men. Get it now pinhead? Everyone else did on the first go around, but for some reason you have to be spoon-fed like a head trauma victim.

    Susan (feigning ignorance once again) said: “There isn’t any fish scent what so ever with the granola. What proof do you have of this?”

    Um, you said it yourself asshat:

    Susan said: “I did a bit of research after you brought up the issue of the fishy smell…Since Yevo uses canola for omega 3, IT’S NO SURPRISE SOME PEOPLE REPORT THE SAME FISHY SMELL that is reported by many with canola.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-3/#comment-1312911

    And your own comment echoes what other distributors have said about the product smelling like fish food, and Marsland’s comments about the product stinking because of protein and fat oxidation; both of which were pointed out to you already.
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-2/#comment-1312262
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-2/#comment-1312324

    Pretending that facts don’t exist doesn’t make them magically vanish. And BTW, the word in English that you struggled to burp out is “whatsoever” not “what so ever (sic).” You can thank me for the ESL lesson later.

    Susan griped: “Are you a complete retard Vogel? Yevo didn’t even exist until 2014. How can a company that didn’t exist in 2014 be related to IRS filings in 2012? This is yet another example of you trying to link completely unrelated minutia to one of your worthless arguments.”

    Oh so it’s “retard” now eh? Your previous claim about being polite and respectful was BS just like everything else you’ve said to date. Putting aside your insensitive and politically incorrect comment about mentally disabled people (and ignoring the adage about people who live in glass houses), what you had said was this:

    “He spends most of his time since his protandim days doing missions work in third world countries, helping children…all of the revenue went to the charity work he does.”

    Myhill’s Protandim days ended in 2005. He then ran a so-called “charity” (Traffic Jam Campaign) from his home in Castle Rock, and he took a nice fat salary and other assorted benefits (proven conclusively by his IRS990 filing). His LinkedIn page indicates that his involvement with Traffic Jam ended in 2014.
    http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/849146/000102189005000208/lifeline1111058kex991.htm
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulrmyhill#sthash.ykWbaCtL.dpuf

    So, I asked quite simply – what substantial evidence do you have regarding any “charity” work he’s doing currently, and more importantly, where the revenue from his Yevo business goes (assuming he’s making any)? I’m not interested in hearsay. Back up your claims like I do or F off!

  40. Vogel says:

    How interesting! I just checked out the Yevo website’s Alexa rankings and compared them with Lazy Man’s.

    http://www.Yevo43.com: rank = 708,897 (global); 248,851 (U.S.)
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com: rank = 185,597 (global); 40,899 (U.S.)
    http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/https%3A%2F%2Fwww.yevo43.com
    http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lazymanandmoney.com

    It’s pretty clear who the overwhelming loser is in this popularity contest.

  41. Vogel says:

    For ample reason, I’ve long thought that Myhill has a screw loose. This pretty much confirms it:

    “…Satan is attacking me big time. I feel that I have a huge target on the back of my head right now and the Devil is trying to meddle in many ways, especially with some key relationships with special friends and family…It’s all affecting my patience and countenance. Satan knows that God is blessing World Orphans in many ways. He knows that millions of orphans can become an army against him. He therefore wants to distract and discourage me. He wants to take me out of the game, even if temporarily. I would GREATLY appreciate your prayers against the evil one. Please saturate me. Please intercede in this battle for me, for the children. Thank you very much, Paul.”
    http://paulmyhill.com/2007/09/blessings-and-b/

    Ignoring for the moment Paul’s rambling about an army of a million orphans fighting Satan, I’m not sure what he means when he says “please saturate me”, but…ewww! The words “please saturate me”, “children” and “orphans” should never appear in the same paragraph. Maybe he’s just being metaphorical and abstract, like when Yevo refers to their sham products as “smoothies” and “granola.” Har, that never ceases to crack me up.

  42. Susan says:

    Vogel said: “Um, you said it yourself asshat:”

    Susan said: “I did a bit of research after you brought up the issue of the fishy smell…Since Yevo uses canola for omega 3, IT’S NO SURPRISE SOME PEOPLE REPORT THE SAME FISHY SMELL that is reported by many with canola.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-3/#comment-1312911

    Yes, and this discussion had nothing to do with the granola product. This discuss was related to the smoothie.

    Yet another example of Vogel pulling a bunch of unrelated facts to try and support a completely incorrect statement and conclusion.

    I restate my previous challenge: Show proof that the Yevo granola has a fishy aroma.

    Vogel said : “Oh so it’s “retard” now eh? Your previous claim about being polite and respectful was BS just like everything else you’ve said to date. Putting aside your insensitive and politically incorrect comment about mentally disabled people (and ignoring the adage about people who live in glass houses), what you had said was this:”

    So, now you are getting sensitive? 75% of your statements are laced with curses, insults, and much more politically incorrect statements than this one. The term I used seemed to be most fitting for your inept stringing together of completely unrelated facts.

    Vogel said : “Myhill’s Protandim days ended in 2005. He then ran a so-called “charity” (Traffic Jam Campaign) from his home in Castle Rock, and he took a nice fat salary and other assorted benefits (proven conclusively by his IRS990 filing). His LinkedIn page indicates that his involvement with Traffic Jam ended in 2014.
    http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/849146/000102189005000208/lifeline1111058kex991.htm

    So, I asked quite simply – what substantial evidence do you have regarding any “charity” work he’s doing currently, and more importantly, where the revenue from his Yevo business goes (assuming he’s making any)? I’m not interested in hearsay. Back up your claims like I do or F off!”

    First off, I wouldn’t call the compensation in those IRS filings a “Fat Salary.” Maybe it is a fat salary when those who are sitting at home playing x-box all day long. For most in the professional world, that isn’t even entry level wages. Second, why does minutia from 2012 have any relevance to what is going on 3-4 years later?

    Like the vast majority of your claims here, you back up your statements with internet links that may or may not have any relevance to the discussions at hand. You then masterfully weave these links into statements and conclusions that fit the point you are trying to make. Just because you are good at spinning a yearn doesn’t mean you have proved anything.

    I stated the following: “Paul (and his wife) is probably one of the most humanitarian people I’ve ever run across. He spends most of his time since his protandim days doing missions work in third world countries, helping children. The Yevo business center he started was totally for his charity work — all of the revenue went to the charity work he does. The main reason I bring this up is I re-read Lazyman’s article and don’t think it’s fair to put down Paul Myhill the way it seems to be doing.”

    The key point here clearly state that these are my impressions of the guy. I heard him state with his own mouth that he created the Yevo business center to support charity work. If you tell me you donate $1,000 per year to Goodwill, how is anyone to prove or disprove this statement?

    Finally, the primary reason I brought all of this up is because Lazyman incorrectly stated Myhill was part of Yevo corporate. Your completely idiotic claim that he didn’t make this exact statement means I’m lying confirms my statement that you are retarded in the exact definition of the term. Nobody with normal brain functions can be this stupid. When you state “So and So started a business,” this by definition means that this person is part of said business structure (what ever that might be).

    You are smearing mud all over a really good person for no valid reason what so ever.

    • Lazy Man says:

      Just to clarify, I don’t believe I ever said that Myhill was part of Yevo corporate. I simply reiterated an email that was sent to me with the link that was provided. The person in the email I quoted may have been incorrect.

      However, this is of no real significance to anything related to Yevo.

  43. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “Yes, and this discussion had nothing to do with the granola product. This discuss was related to the smoothie.”

    So what you’re are saying then is that you admit that the smoothie stinks like fish (because of protein oxidation), and tastes bad because of that and the addition of choline and piles of mineral powder, and yet, despite the fact that Yevo’s not-granola contains those same ingredients, you are arguing that it doesn’t taste and smell bad? That would be an extremely illogical argument. The default assumption should be that of the ingredients are the same, so would the smell and taste issues. That’s aside from the fact that the ingredient label shows that Yevo would taste not taset good garbage because of the fact that it contains no dried fruit, nuts, vanilla, honey, sweetness, etc. — i.e., the very ingredients that define granola and engender it with good flavor.

    Susan said: “So, now you are getting sensitive? 75% of your statements are laced with curses, insults, and much more politically incorrect statements than this one. The term I used seemed to be most fitting for your inept stringing together of completely unrelated facts.”

    I don’t vent on innocent people with mental developmental disorders by using the extremely insensitive and politically incorrect term “retard” like you did, nor am I bound by the same obligations for decorum, since, unlike you, I’m not here representing Yevo. You could just apologize F-face.

    Susan said: “First off, I wouldn’t call the compensation in those IRS filings a “Fat Salary.” Maybe it is a fat salary when those who are sitting at home playing x-box all day long. For most in the professional world, that isn’t even entry level wages. Second, why does minutia from 2012 have any relevance to what is going on 3-4 years later?”

    Myhill ran a charity out of his house, paid himself and his wife $50 thousand dollars in salary from the proceeds, took additional compensation, and took a write-off on their home. There is no concrete evidence that his so-called charitable activities accomplished anything other than that. If you fail to understand why that matters, then again, you’re an idiot.

    Susan said: “Like the vast majority of your claims here, you back up your statements with internet links that may or may not have any relevance to the discussions at hand. You then masterfully weave these links into statements and conclusions that fit the point you are trying to make.”

    I present links (and always relevant ones) to corroborate my statements because they contain facts and evidence, simpleton. You are even dumber than I imagined if you take issue with that process. If you are disputing any of the specific links (i.e., evidence, facts, etc.) I provided, specify what the issue is and I will address it.

    Susan said: “The key point here clearly state that these are my impressions of the guy. I heard him state with his own mouth that he created the Yevo business center to support charity work. If you tell me you donate $1,000 per year to Goodwill, how is anyone to prove or disprove this statement?”

    Exactly! If I simply say I donated to Goodwill, you have no way of knowing whether I’m telling the truth, just like with the Myhill example. If, on the other hand, Goodwill verifies that I made a donation (by giving me a receipt for example), then there is your evidence. So provide some concrete evidence of the charitable activities Myhill’s engaged in or it will be presumed to be meaningless BS.

    Susan said: “Finally, the primary reason I brought all of this up is because Lazyman incorrectly stated Myhill was part of Yevo corporate.”

    For the third F-ing time, Lazy Man did not say that Myhill was part of Yevo Corporate.

    Susan said: “Your completely idiotic claim that he didn’t make this exact statement means I’m lying confirms my statement that you are retarded in the exact definition of the term. Nobody with normal brain functions can be this stupid. When you state “So and So started a business,” this by definition means that this person is part of said business structure (what ever that might be).”

    Wow, you’re even more unhinged today than usual. Lazy Man merely stated that he received an e-mail from someone saying, simply, that Myhill was starting a new company. Lazy man did not make any such claim directly nor did he mention anything at all about Yevo corporate. And in fact, Myhill did start a new company to run his Yevo business, and he dubbed it Paul Myhill Family, LLC.
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulrmyhill

    If you’re weren’t such a colossal asshole, you might have simply said something constructive and tactful like “hey Lazy Man, regarding the details in that e-mail you received, I just wanted to clarify that Myhill is not part of Yevo corporate, lest there be any confusion about that”. Instead you chose to make a dishonest statement, beat a dead horse to death, and make a fool of yourself in the process.

    Susan said: “You are smearing mud all over a really good person for no valid reason what so ever.”

    I’m not “smearing mud all over” anyone. First, I simply pointed out that while Myhill and his wife clearly benefited financially from his so-called “charity” (as proven in the IRS990 filing), there is no evidence that it benefited anyone else. Secondly, I quoted Myhill’s loony diatribe about how the devil is out to get him and how he was trying to incite an army of a million orphan children to fight in an epic battle against Satan. To you, that probably sounds sane. To me it sounds like paranoid schizophrenia. We can let the readers decide for themselves.

    It’s been evident for a long time “Susan” that you are not here for any constructive purpose and that your goal is simply to undermine this blog through misinformation, attrition, and white noise. So going forward, anytime you say something that’s the slightest bit misleading, abrasive, or even mildly nonconstructive, you will earn Yevo at least one much deserved complaint to the FTC and FDA. Are we on the same page now asshole?
    http://www.fda.gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ucm059315.htm https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/GettingStarted?NextQID=67#crnt

  44. Susan says:

    Vogel said: “So what you’re are saying then is that you admit that the smoothie stinks like fish (because of protein oxidation), and tastes bad because of that and the addition of choline and piles of mineral powder, and yet, despite the fact that Yevo’s not-granola contains those same ingredients, you are arguing that it doesn’t taste and smell bad”

    That is not what I said at all. Where did I ever say the smoothie tastes bad? In fact, I said just the opposite. It tastes extremely good. Also, where did I ever say the smoothie mix stinks?

    There are only a few reports of individuals not liking the smell of the smoothie in the dry form. If you compare ANY health food smoothie to one made out of pure sugar and powdered milk, it is going to smell different. The later might smell better but it will will make you fat and clog your arteries, where the former will help you maintain a healthy lifestyle.

    This is yet another example of your twisting of the facts.

    Vogel said “I present links (and always relevant ones) to corroborate my statements because they contain facts and evidence, simpleton”

    In your dreams momma’s boy. As I previously stated, you are just very talented at spinning a yarn. I’ll backup my statement here with a few factual links:

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=spin+a+yarn
    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=yarn
    http://www.finedictionary.com/Spin%20a%20yarn.html

    Hitler was pretty good at doing this too. Look where that got him.

    Vogel said “It’s been evident for a long time “Susan” that you are not here for any constructive purpose and that your goal is simply to undermine this blog through misinformation, attrition, and white noise. So going forward, anytime you say something that’s the slightest bit misleading, abrasive, or even mildly nonconstructive, you will earn Yevo at least one much deserved complaint to the FTC and FDA. Are we on the same page now asshole? http://www.fda.gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ucm059315.htm https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/GettingStarted?NextQID=67#crnt

    This is a roll on the floor laughing kind of a statement. Let me translate the true meaning of what you are really saying:

    I don’t like the fact that you have bruised my intellectual ego because I’m a well known researcher who is good at spinning a yarn and everyone should just accept my statements as fact. It doesn’t matter that I beat up on and insult anyone who challenges my statements because I’m always right. If you don’t stop insulting and challenging me, I’m going to go and tattle on you and you are going to get in trouble.

    Does that about sum it up? What you are REALLY trying to say?

    If you want to give up the minutes off your life to file trivial complaints with regulatory agencies, but all means be my guest.

  45. Vogel says:

    Susan said: “That is not what I said at all…where did I ever say the smoothie mix stinks?”

    Where??? Right here on January 22. You said:

    “Since Yevo uses canola for omega 3, it’s no surprise some people report the same fishy smell…”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-3/#comment-1312911

    Do we really have to keep playing this game of you pretending that you didn’t say something that you actually did say, and me having to remind you? It’s getting old “Susan”

    Susan said: “If you compare ANY health food smoothie to one made out of pure sugar and powdered milk, it is going to smell different. The later might smell better but it will will make you fat and clog your arteries, where the former will help you maintain a healthy lifestyle.”

    Well there’s a BS marketing claim if I’ve ever heard one. You’re saying that your competitors’ smoothies cause blockage of the arteries while Yevo’s not-a-smoothie doesn’t. And why? Simply because some of the competitors’ products have some sugar and powdered milk in them? Yevo’s apple and cinnamon oatmeal contains a whopping 25 g sugar per serving. Their rice gruel has 18 g per serving. That’s far more than in all of the non-MLM brands of oatmeal I analyzed previously.
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313228

    Furthermore, your faux-granola, rice gruel, mashed potato powder, and not-a-smoothie powder all contain milk as an ingredient.

    To make matters worse still, you’re ignoring the fact that Yevo recommends adding milk to reconstitute their not-a-smoothie-powder, as well as to their granola, further devastating your idiotic “milk is bad” argument…
    http://realfoodchoices.com/tag/yevo-smoothie/
    http://www.essential43nc.com/2015/08/yevo-chocolate-milkshake.html
    https://www.yevo43.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Granola-info-sheet-8.5×11.pdf

    …and one of the brands of protein powders I recommended (Isopure) — a far superior product and a better value compared with Yevo’s crap — contains no sugar; and sells for less than half the retail price of Yevo.
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-2/#comment-1312328
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-2/#comment-1312382

    …and Yevo posts recipes for their products that include significant amounts of sugar, butter, milk, and salt.
    https://www.yevo43.com/recipes/

    In other words, the BS fantasy you’re invoking is that sugar and milk only clog arteries when they are in your competitor’s products, but not when they are in your own. These are the kinds of asinine propositions that continually prove you to be a stunning idiot/liar.

    Susan said: “In your dreams momma’s boy. As I previously stated, you are just very talented at spinning a yarn. I’ll backup my statement here with a few factual links: Hitler was pretty good at doing this too. Look where that got him.”
    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=spin+a+yarn
    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=yarn
    http://www.finedictionary.com/Spin%20a%20yarn.html

    Wow! You try to back up your empty accusation by posting no less than THREE links to the definition of “spinning a yarn” — an utterly useless canard — and then devolve from there into a stunning violation of Godwin’s Law. You are a vermin of the lowest order. A perfect fit for Yevo. F-ing idiot!
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin%27s_law

    Susan said: “Let me translate the true meaning of what you are really saying: I don’t like the fact that you have bruised my intellectual ego…If you don’t stop insulting and challenging me, I’m going to go and tattle on you and you are going to get in trouble.”

    ROFL! You can’t win an argument over even the simplest of details when it comes to Yevo, and you haven’t even come close to bruising my “intellectual ego”. All you have done is humiliate yourself. You have amply demonstrated that you are a liar; a petty con artist; a fool; and a colossal asshole; and your intent here is clearly to be a disruptive troll. What I am promising you is justice.

    Susan said: “If you want to give up the minutes off your life to file trivial complaints with regulatory agencies, but all means be my guest.”

    I’ve already given up too many minutes of my life handily eviscerating the pathetically weak and self-serving arguments of a Yevo idiot (i.e., you), and rather than continue to do that, nipping Yevo in the bud is a much more attractive option. People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones, but you’re not smart enough to refrain from shooting yourself in the foot apparently. So congratulations — you just earned Yevo two new complaints today via the FDA and FTC’s online reporting system. If you keep posting more BS and continue acting like a flaming asshole, you will earn a lot more complaints. And Yevo will have you to thank for it.
    http://www.fda.gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ucm059315.htm https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/GettingStarted?NextQID=67#crnt

    Next up – a complaint with the IRS about Myhill’s dubious “charitable” activities. Want to poke a stick in this hornet’s nest. Go ahead and make my day.
    https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f13909.pdf

  46. Susan says:

    Susan said: “That is not what I said at all…where did I ever say the smoothie mix stinks?”

    And Then Vogel Said : “Where??? Right here on January 22. You said:”

    I only commented why SOME were reporting a fishy smell. I never said it stinks. The aroma is very slight and could easily be attributed to canola just as easily as anything you’ve suggested. I provided links credible sources reporting a fishy aroma to canola by some people.

    There is no fishy taste what so ever with the smoothie nor has anyone reported any such taste.

    You are twisting facts and drawing conclusions based on completely unrelated information.

    Susan said: “If you compare ANY health food smoothie to one made out of pure sugar and powdered milk, it is going to smell different. The later might smell better but it will will make you fat and clog your arteries, where the former will help you maintain a healthy lifestyle.”

    And Then Vogel Said : “Well there’s a BS marketing claim if I’ve ever heard one. You’re saying that your competitors’ smoothies cause blockage of the arteries while Yevo’s not-a-smoothie doesn’t”

    You need to learn how to read. Yevo was never part of the line of debate you reference. What I said was that ANY health food smoothie is not going to smell as pleasant as a regular desert type smoothie that is made of nothing but sugar and milk.

    The point I was making, which your simpleton mind can’t seem to grasp, is that health food supplements/foods are not going to smell as nice their counterparts made of the fats and sugars the health food items are replacing.

    Vogel Said “To make matters worse still, you’re ignoring the fact that Yevo recommends adding milk to reconstitute their not-a-smoothie-powder, as well as to their granola, further devastating your idiotic “milk is bad” argument…:

    You are an idiot. Where did I say “Milk is Bad?” What said was that regular smoothies (i.e., ones not designed to be health foods) are typically not good for you. http://www.healthysmoothiehq.com/what-makes-a-smoothie-unhealthy

    Yes, these smoothies might smell better but all the fats and sugar in them makes them bad for you. These smoothie mixes are likely to smell better than most of the health food counter parts. That’s it. End of story

    Vogel Said “— you just earned Yevo two new complaints today via the FDA and FTC’s online reporting system. If you keep posting more BS and continue acting like a flaming asshole, you will earn a lot more complaints. And Yevo will have you to thank for it.
    http://www.fda.gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ucm059315.htm https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/GettingStarted?NextQID=67#crnt

    and then Vogel said : “Next up – a complaint with the IRS about Myhill’s dubious “charitable” activities. Want to poke a stick in this hornet’s nest. Go ahead and make my day.
    https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f13909.pdf

    Let me explain something in words you might be able to understand: I DON’T CARE.

    File all the complaints you want. I honestly (I mean honestly) could care less.

  47. Vogel says:

    Has anyone failed to notice the elephant in the room with respect to Yevo’s unfulfilled product launch announcements? According to Jodi Unruh and other distributors, Yevo was supposed to start shipping more than 20 products by the summer of 2015.
    http://www.jodiunruh.com/blog/peter-castlemans-new-food-mlm-yevo-international-is-now-officially-open-in-canada
    https://plus.google.com/photos/+JodiUnruh/albums/6159746403654515633
    http://foodbiz43.com/yevo-food-recipes-cost/
    http://www.teamresourcehub.com/5-13-15-Team-Marketing-Letter.doc
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.164246637049374.36039.164237137050324&type=3

    Roughly 9 months later, they have only launched about half that many, and those that launched (e.g., rice gruel, oatmeal, not-granola, not-a smoothies, vitamin beans, mineral-powdered potato flakes, and vitamin-fortified coffee/tea) are a helluva lot less exciting than the products Yevo was supposed to be offering.
    https://jodiunruh.myyevo.com/shop

    So where’s the soup? The distributors must be waiting with bated breath (and empty bowls) for the launch of Yevo’s soups (tomato basil, creamed spinach [blech!] and baked potato). And what happened to their “tropical” and “orange cream” flavored not-a-smoothies? What about the alfredo, marinara, and cheddar sauces? The mac and cheese, pad Thai, ramen noodles, and pudding? No sign of them either. And the granola clusters??? What happened to them? Has Yevo’s brain-trust of sad-sacks been unable to figure out how to make soy-based not-granola stick together in cluster form?

    Or is it just that the products tasted so bad that Yevo couldn’t even consider bringing them to market. Or maybe the company never intended to launch them. Or perhaps the company started imploding so fast that these products basically crashed on the launch pad before they could be released. Inquiring minds want to know.

    In any case, it’s more evidence that Yevo is a clown show. Since their soft launch in February 2015, it has been one tragic misstep after another; most notably: (1) failing to launch roughly half of their planned product portfolio; (2) having to reformulate the products because of bad taste/smell (arising from fat and protein oxidation, according to Chip Marsland, who also points out that the inclusion of choline makes the products stink and that they have had difficulty masking the taste of the added mineral powder); and (3) essentially admitting that during their first year of existence, Yevo was using an unfair and presumably illegal compensation plan (i.e., a pyramid scheme) and had to scrap it in favor of a new plan (still a pyramid scheme) that will take effect in March.
    https://www.myyevo.com/resource/deef41c1-5e16-4cfa-b1ec-f81c60810e10

    Of course all of these problems are in addition to having a shallow existing portfolio of 10 stupidly overpriced low-grade products; mind-numbingly bad/deceptive marketing; misleading/illegal testimonials; obviously sketchy and seemingly fraudulent charity for kids; retreads from scandalous Metabolife as Yevo executives, etc.

    I honestly don’t know how these distributors put up with it. Imagine them shelling out all that dough on auto-ship every month, expecting a product line double the current size, and then having to sit dejectedly and actually eat that fish-scented rice gruel and drink those fish-scented not-really-smoothies day after day, while pining instead for a comforting bowl of that long awaited fish-scented powdered mac’n’cheese(’n’soy) and a handful of those fish-scented not-really-granola soy clusters for desert. Man! That takes some kind of Herculean endurance for suffering.

    My guess is that if distributors aren’t already leaving in droves, they soon will be. This could be one of the shortest lived scams of its kind in MLM history.

    One last thing. Can someone please tell me WTF Jodi Unruh was thinking when she posted this claim?

    “Peter [Castleman] has announced a $790 Million budget for this new company that many are touting as the opportunity of a life time
    https://soundcloud.com/yevomlm/yevo-product-testimonies-from-03-22-15-company-call

  48. Vogel says:

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “I only commented why SOME were reporting a fishy smell. I never said it stinks.”

    What I said originally was: “So what you’re are saying then is that you admit that the smoothie stinks like fish.” Fishy smell, which you admit to, is synonymous with “stink”. Are you now going to dry to derail the conversation further by splitting hairs about the definition of “stink”?

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “The aroma…could easily be attributed to canola just as easily as anything you’ve suggested”.

    I’m not “suggesting” anything. As you well know, it was not my “suggestion” but rather Chip Marsland’s explicit admission that the products smell bad because of fat and protein oxidation, as well as the inclusion of choline. He said nothing about canola, and I already debunked this argument when you raised it previously, so there’s no excuse for you continuing to use it. He also said that it was very difficult masking the taste of the mineral powder added to the products. I have posted his quotes and links at least half a dozen times already, so there’s no excuse for you continuing to feign ignorance and chase red herrings.

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “You need to learn how to read. Yevo was never part of the line of debate you reference. What I said was that ANY health food smoothie is not going to smell as pleasant as a regular desert type smoothie that is made of nothing but sugar and milk.”

    Well that’s just an outright lie. What you said (and what I objected to) was:

    “There are only a few reports of individuals not liking the smell of the smoothie in the dry form. If you compare ANY health food smoothie to one made out of pure sugar and powdered milk, it is going to smell different. The later might smell better but it will will make you fat and clog your arteries, where the former will help you maintain a healthy lifestyle.”

    Notice that you didn’t say anything about “regular desert type smoothies” (whatever that nebulous term is supposed to mean), and there’s no such thing as a smoothie made out of nothing but “pure sugar and milk” — if a beverage had that composition, it wouldn’t be a smoothie. You obviously were making a comparison with Yevo’s product by lumping it in with “health food smoothies” (also a nebulous term that you never defined or provided examples of) and comparing it to “the latter”, which you said would clog arteries. It’s bad enough that you say so much stupid shit, but worse still that you don’t take ownership of the stupid things you say.

    To make matters worse – and this was a major part of my objection – you attributed the alleged artery clogging properties of these mystery smoothies to sugar and milk, both of which are abundant in various Yevo products, as I already pointed out to you. Furthermore, Yevo marketing materials recommend reconstituting their not-a-smoothie in milk. In other words, it’s idiotic for you to malign these ingredients and suggest that they clog arteries, while giving a free pass to Yevo products that are abundant in those same ingredients.

    What you did in your latest post, once again, was to create a straw-man and then attack it: i.e. that there are two types of smoothies – “health food store smoothies” and “desert type smoothies”, and suggesting that Yevo is part of the former and superior to the latter. But what you are really saying is that you think Yevo is better than consuming, essentially, a glass of pure sugar and milk. That may or may not be true, but it has absolutely nothing to do with anything we’ve been talking about to date, and it’s certainly not relevant to any of the product nutritional/price comparisons that I have made. Another epic fail on your part.

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “The point I was making, which your simpleton mind can’t seem to grasp, is that health food supplements/foods are not going to smell as nice their counterparts made of the fats and sugars the health food items are replacing.”

    Look ass-hat – there is no smoothie at any health food store that smells like fish. I don’t even know WTF you’re talking about when you say “health food smoothie” or “their counterparts”. What exactly is that supposed to mean? You provided no examples of any of these allegedly fat- and sugar-laden mystery products you are invoking in your effort to exonerate Yevo’s stinky crap not-a-smoothie.

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “Let me explain something in words you might be able to understand: I DON’T CARE. File all the complaints you want. I honestly (I mean honestly) could care less.”

    Duly noted. And you can duly note that you just earned two more. Keep going if you like.

  49. Susan says:

    Vogel said “So where’s the soup? The distributors must be waiting with bated breath (and empty bowls) for the launch of Yevo’s soups (tomato basil, creamed spinach [blech!] and baked potato).”

    It’s all out and then some. These things are part of the diet study. There are probably 6-8 additional items you’ve not listed here plus snack items.

  50. Vogel says:

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “It’s all out and then some. These things are part of the diet study. There are probably 6-8 additional items you’ve not listed here plus snack items.”

    Missing the point again I see. The 10 or so products I mentioned (roughly half the number that were supposed to be offered) are not available for sale to the public; at least according to your, excuse me, I mean “Jodi’s” website.
    https://jodiunruh.myyevo.com/shop

  51. Susan says:

    Susan said: “The aroma…could easily be attributed to canola just as easily as anything you’ve suggested”.

    And then Vogel Said: “I’m not “suggesting” anything. As you well know, it was not my “suggestion” but rather Chip Marsland’s explicit admission that the products smell bad because of fat and protein oxidation, as well as the inclusion of choline. He said nothing about canola, and I already debunked this argument when you raised it previously, so there’s no excuse for you continuing to use it. He also said that it was very difficult masking the taste of the mineral powder added to the products. I have posted his quotes and links at least half a dozen times already, so there’s no excuse for you continuing to feign ignorance and chase red herrings.”

    Marsland’s comments were associated with a completely different product.

    You see, this is a prime example of how you go about trying to prove your point. You post remotely related material and then draw blanket conclusions from them.

    I posted another possibility for the aroma, that is just as plausible, but you choose the former to suite your needs.

    You have shown absolutely NOTHING that proves nor disproves either possibility. It is all conjecture

    It’s a good thing you are a government paid employee and not a criminal defense attorney. You’d be sending innocent people to their deaths with your paper thin arguments.

    Vogel said “Look ass-hat – there is no smoothie at any health food store that smells like fish. I don’t even know WTF you’re talking about when you say “health food smoothie” or “their counterparts””

    That’s because you are a retard. It is no surprise to me you can’t follow very simple logic and examples a child could follow.

    Have you ever opened a can of whey protein and smelled it? Or, a can of smoothie mix that is in the healthfood section at a grocery store and smelled it? Nearly all of them will have strange aromas to them. Once they are constituted, they all smell and taste just fine.

    Compare this to the smell of smoothie, milkshake, or what ever the hell you want to call viscous chocolate liquid.

    Are you really this stupid or are you just trying to argue irrelevant minutia? Probably 50/50 of both.

  52. Vogel says:

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “Marsland’s comments were associated with a completely different product.”

    Marsland’s comment pertained to general difficulties encountered in formulating their products. He was referring to the cocktail of protein, fat (as well as iron, vitamin C, etc.), which is what Yevo adds to virtually all of their products, and how it is susceptible to oxidation and smelling foul. His comments about masking the poor taste of minerals was not-product specific either.

    Sockpuppet Susan said: “Have you ever opened a can of whey protein and smelled it? Or, a can of smoothie mix that is in the healthfood section at a grocery store and smelled it? Nearly all of them will have strange aromas to them. Once they are constituted, they all smell and taste just fine.”

    Yes, I have, and no, it didn’t smell like fish as Yevo does, and it certainly wouldn’t taste fine if reconstituted without actual smoothie ingredients like fruit, milk, and sweetener of some kind. On its own, it would taste something akin to chalk. My health food store doesn’t sell any products called “smoothie mix” so I don’t WTF you mean by that. Don’t invoke vague generalities. If you’re going to mention a product be specific and identify it by name.

    And congrats, you earned two more FDA/FTC complaints

  53. Rob says:

    Susan I’m sure you are a nice person and mean well but my god you are f#cking hardheaded…secondly my smoothies of which i make with whole fruits and vegetables and cashew milk(unsweetened) will trump your overpriced chemistry experiment of a smoothie all day f#cking long…you hear me…all f#cking day!..and i dont have to worry about sh!tting out drywall…

  54. Vogel says:

    Oh this is just too rich for words.
    https://www.facebook.com/yevo43charlotte/photos/a.664850026954811.1073741828.664763686963445/780455892060890/?type=3&theater

    They are comparing Yevo’s overpriced soylent green Frankenfood crap-in-a-bag to a gourmet meal consisting of lamb chops and sauteed vegetables!!!

    These a-holes are so delusional! You can begin counting down the days until this $hit show implodes.

  55. Vogel says:

    Seems like Yevo is dead in the water. No significant news from the company in over two months. May they rest in Hades.

  56. Ron says:

    Just ran across this blog.

    Yevo hasn’t gone out of business as is implied in the last comment. Quite the contrary.

    Yevo is very much alive and growing.

    • Lazy Man says:

      I don’t think it was implied that the company was out of business. I think it was implied that the company didn’t seem to be going anywhere due to a lack of news.

      Looks like Jodi Unruh (who seemed to be a top Yevo distributor) moved on to Laguna Blends, what seems like a hemp MLM company to me.

  57. Joe says:

    Looks like Yevo is done

  58. Vogel says:

    Who could have possibly seen this coming?

    Yevo shuts down due to “lack of success”
    http://behindmlm.com/companies/yevo-shuts-down-due-to-lack-of-success/

    Yevo Closes It’s Network Marketing Operations
    https://www.businessforhome.org/2016/07/yevo-closes-its-network-marketing-operations/

    This would be hysterically funny were it not for the myriad of people who lost their shirts believing the BS that these contemptible Yevo hucksters were spewing. To all the dishonest a-hole kingpins behind this fraudulent operation I say F you very much!

  59. Vogel says:

    July 27, 2016, the day the demise of Yevo was announced, was a very good day indeed.

    Normally I hate to gloat and say I told you but in this case I will make an exception – I’m going to spike the football, do an end-zone victory dance, and for the finale, pull my pants down and stick my ass in the faces of Chip Marsland, Domingo and every distributor who failed to heed my warnings, just before hoisting a baton to lead a marching band blasting a rousing 30-minute long version of “I Told You So” at pain threshold.

    Feb 14, 2016 — Vogel: “This could be one of the shortest lived scams of its kind in MLM history.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1313812

    Feb 22, 2016 — Vogel: “These a-holes are so delusional! You can begin counting down the days until this $hit show implodes.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-4/#comment-1314176

    March 24, 2016 — Vogel: “Seems like Yevo is dead in the water. No significant news from the company in over two months. May they rest in Hades.”

  60. Rachel says:

    Feels like a win to me as I still get the products I love without the clutter of the mlm. Ultimately they just didn’t need that marketing crutch.

  61. Vogel says:

    Rachel said: “Feels like a win to me as I still get the products I love without the clutter of the mlm. Ultimately they just didn’t need that marketing crutch.”

    Back again Jodi?

    Yeah what a win — revolting fishy mashed potato flakes adulterated with mineral powder for the price of a car payment. ROFL!

    Of course they needed the MLM crutch. How else would you convince someone to buy scandalously overpriced crap products if they aren’t being used as the entry fee to join a pyramid scheme and illegally promoted as a cure for everything from Alzheimers to Zika? They are going out of business because everything about the company, including its parasitic marketing and shitty products, were patently absurd.

    The Yevo organization’s collective intellectual firepower couldn’t light a match stick.

    Here’s a giant F U to the scammers who ran this shit show into the ground from start to finish in less than 18 months: David Brown, Kirby Zenger, Jason Domingo, Ben Seeman, Gene Tipps, Paul Myhill, Chip Marsland, Stacey Bell, Jodi Unruh, et al.

    They must have broken a record for fastest flop in MLM history. And I first predicted it only a week after Yevo launched.

    Feb 16, 2015: Vogel – “Man, we are going to have so much fun talking about Yevo over the coming months. It’s possibly the most inept and ill-conceived company in MLM history.”

    Feb 21, 2015: Vogel – “I’ve seen some wildly ill-conceived ideas in the realm of MLM, but this one takes the cake. A real head-scratcher.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-1/#comment-1261755

    March 12, 2015: Vogel – “This could be the dumbest MLM idea ever conceived.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-1/#comment-1266481

    This one is my favorite. Seems particularly prescient now right?

    May 18, 2015: Vogel — “You con artists fool no one, and there are few things in this world that are more certain than the impending failure of this insultingly stupid scam – one of the most poorly conceived in the history of MLM.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-1/#comment-1281410

    Dec 9, 2015: Vogel — “I’m looking forward to the months ahead when we get to continue trashing boneheads like you and laugh ourselves silly while Yevo circles the drain. It truly is one of the dumbest concepts in MLM history and has two of the worst people behind it imaginable (Myhill and disgraced Metabolife/LifeVantage hack David Brown).
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-2/#comment-1310182
    Jan 26, 2016 — Vogel: “The countdown clock to implosion is ticking.”
    http://www.lazymanandmoney.com/yevo-scam/comment-page-3/#comment-1313069

  62. Rachel says:

    Keep up, Vogel. I’m not Jodi, I’m Rachel. The one that likes the shelf-stable, nutrient enriched qualities of the food and will continue ordering it directly from the manufacturer with or without the Yevo name. I’ve since continued to sample a lot of meal replacement shakes and nutrient enriched shelf-stable products, including the ones Lazy Man suggested, and prefer this line to them all both in flavor and satiety. So…enjoy gloating about how they “scammed” people. That’s neither here nor there for me. Honestly, like I said, I’m glad the patent holders of the products themselves seem to have gotten out from under the Yevo disaster.

    • Lazy Man says:

      I haven’t been following this thread of late, but I’d like to point out that it seems that Nutrient Foods, who appears to have made the products is still going to make them available through a website.

      I don’t think anyone will be writing and asking if Nutrient Foods is a scam or suggesting that they may be a pyramid scheme. I’m not sure why that was so difficult. Seems like where we should have started, right?

  63. Vogel says:

    Lazy Man said: “I haven’t been following this thread of late, but I’d like to point out that it seems that Nutrient Foods, who appears to have made the products is still going to make them available through a website. I don’t think anyone will be writing and asking if Nutrient Foods is a scam or suggesting that they may be a pyramid scheme. ”

    Yeah, I saw that too in the announcements about Yevo’s closure. But Nutrient Foods is a joke. No media coverage at all since the company’s opening in Reno was announced in March 2015.
    http://www.rgj.com/story/money/business/2015/03/05/nutrient-foods-open-reno-facility-bringing-jobs/24471657/

    And the company’s website is laughably threadbare.
    http://www.nutrientfoods.com/

    Everything about this company screams loser to me. I can’t imagine that there’s anyone at either Yevo or Nutrient Foods that knows their ass from their elbow. Consider the results of the ingredient comparisons I did a while back on the products that Yevo/Nutrient Foods made. To call them inferior-grade garbage would be an understatement. I can’t imagine anyone foolish enough to buy them at any price, especially considering that they tried to market them through a pyramid scheme. Their integrity is shattered.

    • Lazy Man says:

      Well this is the opportunity for the people at Yevo to put their money where their mouth is. From that article, it seems like Nutrient Foods has the same names/co-founders as Yevo. If the food was really as great as they claimed all along, they’ll have no problem continuing with it and moving forward.

      My guess is that they’ll continue to sell $5 oatmeal in small quantities for the few people who forget to cancel their auto-ships. They are probably winding down inventory as best they can.

      Jodi Unruh is onto Laguna Blends as a “Proven Global Leader”.

  64. […] covered Yevo before it even started. I had one source tell me that they were visited by the FTC (I was hoping to find a second source, […]

  65. Greendroid says:

    Your comments that Yevo went out of business are incorrect. If you look at their website, you will see that they are about to launch a new product on Oct 1. https://www.yevo43.com/

    How can a company that is out of business launch new products?

  66. Greendroid says:

    Lazyman: “My guess is that they’ll continue to sell $5 oatmeal in small quantities for the few people who forget to cancel their auto-ships. They are probably winding down inventory as best they can.”

    Where are you getting your numbers? It is pretty easy to see from Yevo’s website that the cost is $2.30, not $5.00: https://www.yevo43.com/shop/oatmeal

    • Lazy Man says:

      Thanks Greendroid.

      As I may have mentioned previously, I don’t spend my life keeping up with the changes that Yevo makes. The $5 oatmeal thing was something that we covered in the past. You should read the previous comments to see where that number came from. If Yevo’s changed the price, good for them… that just confirms I was originally correct that the market for $5 oatmeal wasn’t good.

      The source that I linked to about Yevo shutting down seems reputable. It might be in the context of shutting down the MLM aspect of Yevo. That’s really the point that I was writing about.

  67. Vogel says:

    That conniving F-stick man-child Paul Myhill has just revealed his latest scam — “Radical Blends”
    https://www.facebook.com/www.rad.zone/

    Yet again, Myhill is hyping a blend of worthless shit. Protandim, Yevo, and now this. When will the madness end?

    Check out the website. What a sad sack loser!
    https://radical-blends.com

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