Ten Things I Hate About Monster.com’s Job Search

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I decided to bite the bullet and begin the job search again. The first step in this process was to update my Monster.com resume. I had forgotten about all the negative things that come with that simple action. I know there are many job sites out there. It may be time for me to start exploring them in more detail. In all honesty, Monster.com can't be blamed for all of these - many of the difficulties below are from recruiters that are likely to be on every job site.

10. Getting 30 e-mails in a day - In 2001 when I was looking for any technology job, I didn't get any e-mails. This may appear to be a weird thing to complain about. However almost all the e-mails are...
9. Irrelevant jobs - If I don't have the skill listed on my resume, it may be safe to assume that I don't have "extensive experience" in that skill.
8. Recruiters - Almost every job is from a recruiter and not the company actually hiring. While recruiters can be helpful, they seem to have "so many jobs available" and rarely just give me the few that match my resume.
7. "Send me your resume" - Every e-mail I've gotten from a recruiter on Monster requests this. Aren't they looking at my resume before contacting me? One recruiter actually wrote me, "After looking your resume, we feel you'd be a fit for several jobs we have available. Can you please forward on your resume?"
6. "Excellent salary and benefits including generous stock options" - Every company is offering that. If everyone is offering excellent salary then aren't they offering average salary? I'll be sure to make note this if it comes down to salary negotiations. I'd love the opportunity to open up Salary.com, call up these e-mails and ask for the salary in the 80 percentile.
5. "Call me and we'll discuss opportunities" - Recruiters must love talking on the phone. Unfortunately, it's terribly inconvenient and inefficient to talk to 20 recruiters in a day. It's far easier for me to keep all job descriptions straight with e-mail. Yet no one seems to want that way. Let's just pretend we are dating or making friends online - start out with e-mails, see if we have common interests, and then proceed to phone and meeting in person.
4. Mystery Companies - The recruiters never tell you the company they have the job for. I don't know how I am supposed to give an opinion on a job without knowing the company. I understand why recruiters don't give the company name (for fear that you'll just apply directly to that company), but it's one of the most basic pieces of information.
3. Invites to LinkedIn - A couple of recruiters have asked to join my LinkedIn account. Why would I want to be connected to them? We don't have a relationship other than they saw my resume online, e-mailed me, and I responded. I get the feeling this serves them more than it serves me.
2. "We like what we saw on your resume, please apply for a job our website" - Wait a second, you already have my resume. The necessary information is all there. Why do I need to go through the effort of entering my name, address, e-mail, education, main phone, secondary phone, cell phone, cell phone provider (I'm not making this up), desired salary as one place asked. By the way, I desire at least 2 million dollar a year - actually let's better bump that up to 5 million.
1. Interstitial ads - Every time you log in, I see a paid advertisement for Monster.com. It has all my information pre-filled from my Monster.com resume with a big button to accept whatever the advertisement is offering. Unless you are very careful to select the "No Thanks" every time, be prepared for a world of spam. I fear one day I may accidentally move my sensitive mouse slightly as I click hitting the "I agree" button. Monster has no option to opt-out of these.

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Job

Posted on December 5, 2007.

How to Ask for a Raise (Part 4 – Final)

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Back in May, I wrote three posts on how to ask for a raise. I don't really feel I got what I should have and my old company went as far to say that I should be getting about 15% more, but it just wasn't in the budget.

I wouldn't bring it up except that this month's Money magazine mentions it on page 54B (by the way, what's up with the letters). Their first hint was to toot your own horn. Well they had done that part for me saying what I terrific job I had been doing. I got a combination response of "tied hands" (nothing in the budget), and "lowball" (much less than I was expecting). So, I accepted the raise with dignity, but suggested an alternative (as Money Magazine suggests) to substitute the difference. Unfortunately that went nowhere as well and I ended up leaving the company, not solely due to that, but that played a large role.

It makes me feel good that I played the game well. I just wish both sides could have come to an agreement. I know that we both would have been better off if we did.

This post deals with: ... and focuses on:

Job

Last updated on July 29, 2011.

Starting Work…

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I'm starting my new job this week. This means that I'll reduce the quantity of my postings. Additionally, the time I'll be able to make posts will be fairly unconvenient for the east coasters out there. A fortunate side effect is that I'll be able to raise the quality of the posts.

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Job

Last updated on December 14, 2006.

How Much Is My 401(k) Plan Worth?

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It turns out that my new company doesn't offer a 401(k) plan. This was a little alarming. I can't really think of a reason why a company wouldn't offer one. My last company of 20 employees did. It didn't match any of my contributions, but at least I could defer my taxes.

So it got me wondering, how much does this impact me? SmartMoney.com comes to the rescue with this article and calculator. Using it, I found that my old 401(k) plan was worth $6,613. It's going to be disappointing to lose my 401(k) and the forced savings, but I still think I'm going to do fine.

This post deals with: ... and focuses on:

Job, Retirement

Last updated on July 29, 2011.

Finally a Job Offer

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Thank goodness, I finally have an offer for gainful employment. It's not as gainful as I would have hoped though. Once again, it looks like I'm going to have to a discount to what the general market is for my skills. While it's more money than I made at my previous job, with the increased costs of living, it turns out to be less in my pocket. At least there's some good perks like lunch brought in every day and free dinner if you stay late enough. It's incredible how standard that is around San Francisco.

It's a job that I think I can really excel at. It's going to be a challenge to try to save money in this environment.

This post deals with: ... and focuses on:

Job, Relocation

Last updated on December 14, 2006.

Getting Close to the Move and Still no Job

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You'd think it would be easy to find a job in Silicon Valley for an engineer with 7-8 years of experience. Every recruiter (and there have been 40-50) says that it shouldn't be a problem. Yet, I haven't gotten any offers and they don't seem to be coming back to me as much as they did just a couple of weeks ago.

Fate may have stepped in when Lifehacker (one of my favorite blogs) pointed me in the direction of an article on How to Get a Silicon Valley job. You can't get too much more specific or timely than that. The first recommendation is to seek out the companies you like and apply to them. Interestingly, I had sent out an e-mail like that the day before and got a response back really quickly. I'm not used to working for companies that care if their employees use the product - it just makes too much good sense.

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Job, Relocation

Last updated on December 14, 2006.

Future is So Bright…

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... that I gotta wear shades. I've been busting with happiness the last couple of days. One of the Internet social networking companies has offered to fly me in for an in-person interview. The company seems to be really going places. They are small enough that I can make a difference there, and big enough that I don't have to worry about them going out of business.

I have reason to believe that I'm going to be getting a 50% raise over what I was making at the same time last year. I'm not sure what I'm going to be doing with the money. I know some percentage will go to increased costs of living in San Francisco. However, there should be a significant chunk left over to fund my Prosper account. I'm trying to stay in the top 1,000 lenders Eric Credit Community and this should help.

This post deals with: ... and focuses on:

Investing, Job

Last updated on December 14, 2006.

Raise Not There

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I've had a bit of a running commentary about asking for a raise, here, here and here. At the end of the process, I didn't get what I was looking for. At least I thought I got something. Well, I must have misunderstood, because it didn't show up in my paycheck when I expected. After a little clarification, it seems that the time when I can expect the raise is kind of vague, but coming soon by all accounts.

A huge monkey-wrench got thrown into the works when I got confirmation that I will still be making 15% less than my peers. And the way things have been going with recent policy changes, I think those peers will be looking for more money as well, widing the gap even further.

I'm glad that I've had a good two week head-start on the job search.

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Job

Last updated on July 29, 2011.

Raise Update (part 3)

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This is the last of the series. I heard back from the boss man about what could be done. Apparently the best they could was to put me in the 25% percentile of a person with 2 year less experience than me (according to Salary.com). For my current experience, I'd say it's probably around the 10% percentile. It's a weird feeling to make more money and be even more unhappy than I was the day before. I suppose it's because I feel I used my one "ask for a raise" card for at least a year.

For a little while, I've been turning away recruiters. Now I think I will start to listen.

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Job

Last updated on December 14, 2006.

Raise Update (part 1)

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I chickened out in asking for a raise on Friday. I did have a talk with the boss man and dropped a subtle hint. As importantly, I wanted to find out if there was any truth in a rumor about the company and a new venture it was taking. Turns out there was no truth to the rumor. At that point, I figured I had used up the enough of the "private talk" time for the day.

Interestingly, about ten minutes after that I got to talk with the CEO about another new venture the company was going into. It's a different and unrelated to the one I was asking about. The message was that changes are coming soon. The best part is that there's now a more concrete reason for me asking for a raise with the expanded responsibilities.

Now I just have to rehearse how it's going to go. Look for part 2 or even a part 3 with the results.

This post deals with: ... and focuses on:

Job

Last updated on December 14, 2006.

 
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